Changes in Stressors and Coping Responses in Latina Adolescents: Findings from a Mixed-Method Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158868
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changes in Stressors and Coping Responses in Latina Adolescents: Findings from a Mixed-Method Pilot Study
Abstract:
Changes in Stressors and Coping Responses in Latina Adolescents: Findings from a Mixed-Method Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Garcia, Carolyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:6126246179
Co-Authors:C. Garcia, J. Pintor, C. Orth, S. Lara, E. Shapiro, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Background: Latina (female) adolescents report high rates of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation. It is plausible they are encountering stressors beyond those associated with normative developmental processes, or they may lack healthy coping skills. Purposes: Identify changes in stressors and coping responses among Latina adolescent girls and compare coping responses to standard coping measures. Theoretical Framework: Health realization and Frydenburg's coping framework. Sample: 9th or 10th grade Latina adolescents in an urban school. Method: Latina teens were randomized to intervention or attention control conditions in a semester-long group-format mental health/stress management intervention. Bilingual educators facilitated 14 two-hour sessions (sharing, exercise, skills). The attention control consisted of a facilitated health-promotion group. Responses to open-ended questions about stressors and coping responses were collected at baseline and three-month post-intervention. Content analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software to identify and quantify stressors and coping responses across time within participant and across conditions. Results: Forty-two recruited adolescents (mean age 14.8 +/- 0.72) were randomized. Thirty-one (74%) completed the protocol with high participation rates. Three-month post data were collected from 32 participants. Reported stressors were categorized into: Relationships, Family, School, and Death. One hundred and twelve coping responses were identified. Eighty-two percent were categorized as healthy (confiding in someone, resolving conflict) versus 18% unhealthy (substance use, self-mutilation). From baseline to 3-month post intervention, both conditions improved their use of positive coping responses (74% to 89% intervention; 70% to 100% control). Implications: Latina adolescents identify developmentally consistent stressors and coping strategies. An intervention that provides facilitated group opportunities for Latina adolescents may encourage healthy coping, regardless of content delivered. Further mixed-method longitudinal research is needed to inform coping measurement with Latina adolescents. Understanding how Latina adolescents cope with stressors may facilitate effective health promoting nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanges in Stressors and Coping Responses in Latina Adolescents: Findings from a Mixed-Method Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158868-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Changes in Stressors and Coping Responses in Latina Adolescents: Findings from a Mixed-Method Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garcia, Carolyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6126246179</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garcia@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Garcia, J. Pintor, C. Orth, S. Lara, E. Shapiro, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Latina (female) adolescents report high rates of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation. It is plausible they are encountering stressors beyond those associated with normative developmental processes, or they may lack healthy coping skills. Purposes: Identify changes in stressors and coping responses among Latina adolescent girls and compare coping responses to standard coping measures. Theoretical Framework: Health realization and Frydenburg's coping framework. Sample: 9th or 10th grade Latina adolescents in an urban school. Method: Latina teens were randomized to intervention or attention control conditions in a semester-long group-format mental health/stress management intervention. Bilingual educators facilitated 14 two-hour sessions (sharing, exercise, skills). The attention control consisted of a facilitated health-promotion group. Responses to open-ended questions about stressors and coping responses were collected at baseline and three-month post-intervention. Content analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software to identify and quantify stressors and coping responses across time within participant and across conditions. Results: Forty-two recruited adolescents (mean age 14.8 +/- 0.72) were randomized. Thirty-one (74%) completed the protocol with high participation rates. Three-month post data were collected from 32 participants. Reported stressors were categorized into: Relationships, Family, School, and Death. One hundred and twelve coping responses were identified. Eighty-two percent were categorized as healthy (confiding in someone, resolving conflict) versus 18% unhealthy (substance use, self-mutilation). From baseline to 3-month post intervention, both conditions improved their use of positive coping responses (74% to 89% intervention; 70% to 100% control). Implications: Latina adolescents identify developmentally consistent stressors and coping strategies. An intervention that provides facilitated group opportunities for Latina adolescents may encourage healthy coping, regardless of content delivered. Further mixed-method longitudinal research is needed to inform coping measurement with Latina adolescents. Understanding how Latina adolescents cope with stressors may facilitate effective health promoting nursing interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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