An International Comparison of School Nurses' Role Responsibilities related to Youth with Asthma

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158869
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An International Comparison of School Nurses' Role Responsibilities related to Youth with Asthma
Abstract:
An International Comparison of School Nurses' Role Responsibilities related to Youth with Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Garwick, Ann, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street Southeast, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-1141
Co-Authors:A. Garwick, W. Looman, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; E. Kolbrun Svavarsdottir, B. Orlygsdottir, Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, ICELAND; R. ?sk Erlendsdóttir, , Centre for Child Health Services, Reykjav
Childhood asthma is a serious global health problem. The purpose of the International School Nurse Asthma Project (I-SNAP) is to identify and compare the roles of school nurses who are coordinating and managing asthma care with younger (ages 10-14) and older (ages 15-18) adolescents in St. Paul, MN and Reykjavik, Iceland. The conceptual framework guiding this study is family-centered care coordination, where youth and family strengths, input, and developmental needs are central to care coordination. Three focus groups with school nurses were conducted in both Reykjavik (n=19 nurses) and St. Paul (n=15 nurses) using the same protocol, which included a self-report demographic questionnaire. Audiotaped focus group sessions were transcribed verbatim, and Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Content analytic techniques were used to categorize and compare the types of school nurse roles and responsibilities in asthma care coordination. School nurses in both countries identified core role responsibilities related to asthma screening, education of staff and students, and care coordination. However, school nurses in Iceland reported spending proportionately less time per week coordinating care for youth with asthma than school nurses in St. Paul. Reykjavik school nurses reported that asthma was typically well controlled among students and focused their efforts on health education and promotion. In contrast, St. Paul nurses noted more poorly controlled asthma cases where they needed to focus on asthma management at school and link students to health care providers. Differences in the health care systems between the two countries help explain differences in the primary role responsibilities of the school nurses related to asthma. Children in Iceland have access to universal health care coverage and primary care in community clinics located near schools. In the U.S., there are well-documented disparities in access to care and lack of resources that can limit a child's access to primary care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn International Comparison of School Nurses' Role Responsibilities related to Youth with Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158869-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An International Comparison of School Nurses' Role Responsibilities related to Youth with Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garwick, Ann, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street Southeast, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-1141</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">garwi001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Garwick, W. Looman, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; E. Kolbrun Svavarsdottir, B. Orlygsdottir, Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, ICELAND; R. ?sk Erlendsd&oacute;ttir, , Centre for Child Health Services, Reykjav</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Childhood asthma is a serious global health problem. The purpose of the International School Nurse Asthma Project (I-SNAP) is to identify and compare the roles of school nurses who are coordinating and managing asthma care with younger (ages 10-14) and older (ages 15-18) adolescents in St. Paul, MN and Reykjavik, Iceland. The conceptual framework guiding this study is family-centered care coordination, where youth and family strengths, input, and developmental needs are central to care coordination. Three focus groups with school nurses were conducted in both Reykjavik (n=19 nurses) and St. Paul (n=15 nurses) using the same protocol, which included a self-report demographic questionnaire. Audiotaped focus group sessions were transcribed verbatim, and Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Content analytic techniques were used to categorize and compare the types of school nurse roles and responsibilities in asthma care coordination. School nurses in both countries identified core role responsibilities related to asthma screening, education of staff and students, and care coordination. However, school nurses in Iceland reported spending proportionately less time per week coordinating care for youth with asthma than school nurses in St. Paul. Reykjavik school nurses reported that asthma was typically well controlled among students and focused their efforts on health education and promotion. In contrast, St. Paul nurses noted more poorly controlled asthma cases where they needed to focus on asthma management at school and link students to health care providers. Differences in the health care systems between the two countries help explain differences in the primary role responsibilities of the school nurses related to asthma. Children in Iceland have access to universal health care coverage and primary care in community clinics located near schools. In the U.S., there are well-documented disparities in access to care and lack of resources that can limit a child's access to primary care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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