2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158871
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Pressure Ulcer Risk Factors and Risk Assessment Scales
Abstract:
Evaluation of Pressure Ulcer Risk Factors and Risk Assessment Scales
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hagle, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:1921 E. Hartford Ave, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-828-2279
Co-Authors:M.E. Hagle, T. Kim, P. Senk, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; M.E. Hagle, P. Senk, Nursing, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI;
Purpose: Risk assessment is critical in identifying patients who may develop a pressure ulcer and to institute preventive strategies. Of more than 22 risk assessment scales available for adult healthcare settings, Braden, Norton, and Waterlow have been used most frequently. In studies of these scales, their subscales, and other risk factors, there are inconsistent findings on the best set of risk factors that can be tested for predicting and preventing pressure ulcers. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate risk factors and compare psychometric properties and predictability of the three scales. Conceptual Framework: According to Defloor's model (1999), compressive and shearing forces cause pressure ulcers if intensity and duration are significant and the patient's tissue tolerances for pressure or oxygen are at risk. Method/ Subjects: The literature was systematically searched by a research librarian with publications limited to English-only, 1995-2008. Studies were critically evaluated for risk factors, psychometric properties and predictability of risk scales in acute care with adults, sample size, persons conducting assessments, and evidence type. From 627 retrieved papers, 41 studies were included. Results: Three risk factors, the global score, and three subscale scores were significantly related to pressure ulcer development. For psychometric evaluation and predictability, 15 studies were applicable for Braden Scale, 4 for Norton Scale, 4 for Waterlow Scale, and 3 studies for subscale analysis. All tools had similar acceptable values for two of six psychometric properties, while Braden and Norton demonstrated similar acceptable values for four properties. Conclusions: Three significant risk factors are not included in two widely-used scales. All scales have limitations in their psychometric properties and predictability, limiting their value. Additional research is needed to test these risk factors for predictability and support of nurses' decision making to identify patients at risk for pressure ulcers and use of appropriate interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Pressure Ulcer Risk Factors and Risk Assessment Scalesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158871-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Pressure Ulcer Risk Factors and Risk Assessment Scales</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hagle, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1921 E. Hartford Ave, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-828-2279</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hagle@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.E. Hagle, T. Kim, P. Senk, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; M.E. Hagle, P. Senk, Nursing, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Risk assessment is critical in identifying patients who may develop a pressure ulcer and to institute preventive strategies. Of more than 22 risk assessment scales available for adult healthcare settings, Braden, Norton, and Waterlow have been used most frequently. In studies of these scales, their subscales, and other risk factors, there are inconsistent findings on the best set of risk factors that can be tested for predicting and preventing pressure ulcers. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate risk factors and compare psychometric properties and predictability of the three scales. Conceptual Framework: According to Defloor's model (1999), compressive and shearing forces cause pressure ulcers if intensity and duration are significant and the patient's tissue tolerances for pressure or oxygen are at risk. Method/ Subjects: The literature was systematically searched by a research librarian with publications limited to English-only, 1995-2008. Studies were critically evaluated for risk factors, psychometric properties and predictability of risk scales in acute care with adults, sample size, persons conducting assessments, and evidence type. From 627 retrieved papers, 41 studies were included. Results: Three risk factors, the global score, and three subscale scores were significantly related to pressure ulcer development. For psychometric evaluation and predictability, 15 studies were applicable for Braden Scale, 4 for Norton Scale, 4 for Waterlow Scale, and 3 studies for subscale analysis. All tools had similar acceptable values for two of six psychometric properties, while Braden and Norton demonstrated similar acceptable values for four properties. Conclusions: Three significant risk factors are not included in two widely-used scales. All scales have limitations in their psychometric properties and predictability, limiting their value. Additional research is needed to test these risk factors for predictability and support of nurses' decision making to identify patients at risk for pressure ulcers and use of appropriate interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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