Effects of Men's Prostate Cancer Treatment on Spouses' Appraisal and Quality of Life at 24 Months Post Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158872
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Men's Prostate Cancer Treatment on Spouses' Appraisal and Quality of Life at 24 Months Post Treatment
Abstract:
Effects of Men's Prostate Cancer Treatment on Spouses' Appraisal and Quality of Life at 24 Months Post Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Harden, Janet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:5557 Cass Ave, Room 372 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-4126
Co-Authors:J.K. Harden, H. Yarandi, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; J. Wei, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; L. Hembroff, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI; M. S
Purpose: The purpose was to determine the effects of prostate cancer treatment on spouses' appraisal of their cancer situation and their quality of life, during survivorship at 24 months post treatment. Methods: The design for this study was prospective and longitudinal. Partners of men participating in a prospective, longitudinal multi-site (6 sites across the United States) study of men treated for early stage prostate cancer were recruited to participate in this study at 24 and 36 months post treatment. This submission reports 24 month assessments only. Results: The sample consisted of 122 partners mostly female spouses. Multiple regressions conducted on the appraisal of caregiving (Stress, benefit, threat) and quality of life measures, (the SF-12 and CQOLC) revealed significant effect by age. Younger spouses (under 65) who had more negative appraisal of caregiving also had significantly poorer quality of life. Correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between spouses' perceptions of bother about their husband's treatment outcomes and negative appraisal of their cancer situation. Spouses who perceived more bother from their husband's urinary incontinence, overall urinary function (p< .001), bowel habits (p = -.02) and hormone problems (p < .003) had more negative appraisal of their situation. Further, younger spouses, expressed more bother related to their husbands' sexual function (p< .03) at 24 months following his treatment. Conclusions: Spouses' negative appraisal of their cancer situation had a reciprocal affect on quality of life: more negative appraisal resulted in lower quality of life scores. Men's treatment outcomes (urinary incontinence, overall urinary function, bowel habits and hormone problems) continued to bother the partner and resulted in more negative appraisal and lower quality of life at 24 months post treatment. Research Implications: Findings support the concept that prostate cancer affects not only the person diagnosed with the disease but also his partner. Partners may benefit from tailored interventions designed to decrease negative appraisal (related to stress and threat) and improve quality of life during survivorship period. Acknowledgement:This study was funded by a National Cancer Institute grant
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Men's Prostate Cancer Treatment on Spouses' Appraisal and Quality of Life at 24 Months Post Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158872-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Men's Prostate Cancer Treatment on Spouses' Appraisal and Quality of Life at 24 Months Post Treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harden, Janet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5557 Cass Ave, Room 372 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-4126</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jharden@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.K. Harden, H. Yarandi, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; J. Wei, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; L. Hembroff, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI; M. S</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose was to determine the effects of prostate cancer treatment on spouses' appraisal of their cancer situation and their quality of life, during survivorship at 24 months post treatment. Methods: The design for this study was prospective and longitudinal. Partners of men participating in a prospective, longitudinal multi-site (6 sites across the United States) study of men treated for early stage prostate cancer were recruited to participate in this study at 24 and 36 months post treatment. This submission reports 24 month assessments only. Results: The sample consisted of 122 partners mostly female spouses. Multiple regressions conducted on the appraisal of caregiving (Stress, benefit, threat) and quality of life measures, (the SF-12 and CQOLC) revealed significant effect by age. Younger spouses (under 65) who had more negative appraisal of caregiving also had significantly poorer quality of life. Correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between spouses' perceptions of bother about their husband's treatment outcomes and negative appraisal of their cancer situation. Spouses who perceived more bother from their husband's urinary incontinence, overall urinary function (p&lt; .001), bowel habits (p = -.02) and hormone problems (p &lt; .003) had more negative appraisal of their situation. Further, younger spouses, expressed more bother related to their husbands' sexual function (p&lt; .03) at 24 months following his treatment. Conclusions: Spouses' negative appraisal of their cancer situation had a reciprocal affect on quality of life: more negative appraisal resulted in lower quality of life scores. Men's treatment outcomes (urinary incontinence, overall urinary function, bowel habits and hormone problems) continued to bother the partner and resulted in more negative appraisal and lower quality of life at 24 months post treatment. Research Implications: Findings support the concept that prostate cancer affects not only the person diagnosed with the disease but also his partner. Partners may benefit from tailored interventions designed to decrease negative appraisal (related to stress and threat) and improve quality of life during survivorship period. Acknowledgement:This study was funded by a National Cancer Institute grant</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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