A Pilot Study of a Skin-to-Skin Care Intervention in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158873
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pilot Study of a Skin-to-Skin Care Intervention in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects
Abstract:
A Pilot Study of a Skin-to-Skin Care Intervention in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Harrison, Tondi, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-1497
Co-Authors:T.M. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Background: Infants born with complex congenital heart defects (CCHD) requiring corrective or palliative surgery within the first days or weeks of life demonstrate impaired autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Schore suggests the quality of interactions between mothers and infants affects ANS function. During the first weeks of life, maternal-infant interactions occur primarily through close physical contact. Newborn infants with CCHD and their mothers are physically separated due to the infant's need for intensive medical and nursing care. Early separation impairs infant ANS function. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is effective in improving infant ANS function in other populations. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of daily SSC between mothers and full-term infants with CCHD. Methods: Ten mothers and their infants with a CCHD will be recruited within the first week of life. SSC will be implemented after surgery after initiation of oral feedings and provided one hour daily for 14 consecutive days. Data will be collected before and after the 14-day intervention and biweekly for the subsequent six weeks. Feasibility and acceptability of the study will be measured using a survey with open- and closed-ended questions, maternal recording of duration and frequency of holding infant, and semi-structured interviews with nursing staff. Safety will be measured by the infant's ability to stay within physician-defined cardiorespiratory parameters during SSC. ANS function will be measured with heart rate variability. Data will be analyzed using content analysis, descriptive statistics, empirical change plots, and event history analysis. Results: It is expected that SSC will be safe, mothers will find the SSC intervention acceptable, and a larger study will be feasible. Conclusions: The study is an important first step in testing a model to describe the effect of maternal-infant physical contact on ANS function in infants with CCHD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pilot Study of a Skin-to-Skin Care Intervention in Infants with Congenital Heart Defectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158873-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Pilot Study of a Skin-to-Skin Care Intervention in Infants with Congenital Heart Defects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Tondi, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-160 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-1497</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">harr1179@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.M. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Infants born with complex congenital heart defects (CCHD) requiring corrective or palliative surgery within the first days or weeks of life demonstrate impaired autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Schore suggests the quality of interactions between mothers and infants affects ANS function. During the first weeks of life, maternal-infant interactions occur primarily through close physical contact. Newborn infants with CCHD and their mothers are physically separated due to the infant's need for intensive medical and nursing care. Early separation impairs infant ANS function. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is effective in improving infant ANS function in other populations. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of daily SSC between mothers and full-term infants with CCHD. Methods: Ten mothers and their infants with a CCHD will be recruited within the first week of life. SSC will be implemented after surgery after initiation of oral feedings and provided one hour daily for 14 consecutive days. Data will be collected before and after the 14-day intervention and biweekly for the subsequent six weeks. Feasibility and acceptability of the study will be measured using a survey with open- and closed-ended questions, maternal recording of duration and frequency of holding infant, and semi-structured interviews with nursing staff. Safety will be measured by the infant's ability to stay within physician-defined cardiorespiratory parameters during SSC. ANS function will be measured with heart rate variability. Data will be analyzed using content analysis, descriptive statistics, empirical change plots, and event history analysis. Results: It is expected that SSC will be safe, mothers will find the SSC intervention acceptable, and a larger study will be feasible. Conclusions: The study is an important first step in testing a model to describe the effect of maternal-infant physical contact on ANS function in infants with CCHD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:28:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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