2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158877
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-Life Care Preferences among Older Korean Americans
Abstract:
End-of-Life Care Preferences among Older Korean Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kim, Minju, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:318 Chicago Ave #1J, Oak Park, IL, 60302, USA
Contact Telephone:2242171441
Co-Authors:M. Kim, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M.D. Foreman, College of Nursing, Rush Unversity, Chicago, IL;
Little is known about the preferences of older Korean-Americans for end-of-life care, e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, artificial food and fluids, and palliation. Therefore, the purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive study was to identify the preferences of older Korean-Americans for end-of-life care and the factors associated with these preferences. The Framework for End-of-life Transition Research (Wilkie et al., 2007) guided this study. The subjects for this study included 131 older Korean-Americans aged 65 years and older (Mean age 71.5 years plus or minus 5.7), predominately female (72%), college educated (43.9%), in good or very good health (66.9%), and residing in the greater Chicagoland area. These individuals completed a standard questionnaire in Korean including preferences for the use of the four types of end of life care identified above in a hypothetical scenario of a terminal illness, the Familism Scale, the importance of family burden in end-of-life care decision-making, and demographics. In general, older Korean-Americans had negative attitudes toward life-support care (mean ratings: CPR 2.22 plus or minus 1.44; ventilator 1.59 plus or minus .99; artificial food of fluids 1.70 plus or minus 1.09) and positive attitudes toward palliative care (3.67 plus or minus 1.53) on a 5-point scale 91 = definitely do not want; 5 = definitely want). Using multiple regression analysis, the preference for palliative care was associated with low familism and high family burden with end-of-life care decision making (p < 0.05); and women did not prefer life support care and CPR (p < 0.05). To conclude, older Korean-Americans preferred less aggressive, comfort-focused end-of-life care. The influence of family burden and familism in end-of-life care decision-making was consistent with family-centered Korean culture and may place older Korean-Americans at risk of receiving unwanted care that is consistent with their preferences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-Life Care Preferences among Older Korean Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158877-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End-of-Life Care Preferences among Older Korean Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Minju, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">318 Chicago Ave #1J, Oak Park, IL, 60302, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">2242171441</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkim79@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Kim, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M.D. Foreman, College of Nursing, Rush Unversity, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about the preferences of older Korean-Americans for end-of-life care, e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, artificial food and fluids, and palliation. Therefore, the purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive study was to identify the preferences of older Korean-Americans for end-of-life care and the factors associated with these preferences. The Framework for End-of-life Transition Research (Wilkie et al., 2007) guided this study. The subjects for this study included 131 older Korean-Americans aged 65 years and older (Mean age 71.5 years plus or minus 5.7), predominately female (72%), college educated (43.9%), in good or very good health (66.9%), and residing in the greater Chicagoland area. These individuals completed a standard questionnaire in Korean including preferences for the use of the four types of end of life care identified above in a hypothetical scenario of a terminal illness, the Familism Scale, the importance of family burden in end-of-life care decision-making, and demographics. In general, older Korean-Americans had negative attitudes toward life-support care (mean ratings: CPR 2.22 plus or minus 1.44; ventilator 1.59 plus or minus .99; artificial food of fluids 1.70 plus or minus 1.09) and positive attitudes toward palliative care (3.67 plus or minus 1.53) on a 5-point scale 91 = definitely do not want; 5 = definitely want). Using multiple regression analysis, the preference for palliative care was associated with low familism and high family burden with end-of-life care decision making (p &lt; 0.05); and women did not prefer life support care and CPR (p &lt; 0.05). To conclude, older Korean-Americans preferred less aggressive, comfort-focused end-of-life care. The influence of family burden and familism in end-of-life care decision-making was consistent with family-centered Korean culture and may place older Korean-Americans at risk of receiving unwanted care that is consistent with their preferences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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