2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158883
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression, Perceived Health Status, and Glucose Control among Mexican Americans
Abstract:
Depression, Perceived Health Status, and Glucose Control among Mexican Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Martinez, Nelda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at El Paso
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:1101 N. Campbell St., El Paso, TX, 79902, USA
Contact Telephone:915-747-7251
Co-Authors:N.C. Martinez, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX;
Diabetes and depression are closely associated but few studies have explored this correlation among Mexican Americans (MA). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between depression and diabetes among MAs and explore these findings in association with perceived health status and glucose control. Method(s): A convenience sample of 57 MA participating in a genetic study (28 with diabetes and 29 without) were asked to complete either the Spanish or English language version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) and the Self-Health Rating (SHR) scales. Fasting blood samples were obtained to determine overall glucose control (Hemoglobin A1c level). Results: Subjects in both groups were similar in age, gender, and marital status while those with diabetes had lower levels of education and income. Those with diabetes scored significantly higher on the CES-D versus those without diabetes (mean=20.64, SD=9.37 vs. 14.03, SD=7.46; t=-2.87, p<.006) reflecting they experienced more feelings or behaviors associated with depression. Per scale item, both groups yielded similar results with scoring the highest and non-significant difference on Q16 "I enjoyed life" (mean=2.50, SD=.745 vs. 2.38, SD=1.05; t=-.499, p<.62) as well as the lowest on Q9 "I thought my life had been a failure" (mean=.103, SD=.745 vs. .138, SD=.409; t=-1.348, p<.18). Those with diabetes had a significantly higher HgA1c level versus those without diabetes (mean=7.40, SD=1.31 vs. 5.86, SD=.35; t=-6.09, p<.0001)reflecting more poor glucose control; they also perceived their health status significantly lower (fair-good) than those without diabetes (good-very good) (mean=3.32, SD=.945 vs. 2.55, SD=1.05; t=-2.898, p<.005). However, their perceived health status was not significantly associated with their glucose control (r=.268, p<.178) but was with their level of depression (r=.59, p<.0006). Conclusion: Mexican Americans with diabetes reflected a higher level of depression, more poor glucose control, as well as a lower self-rating of their health when compared to those without diabetes. Key interventions require attention to the role of socio-cultural factors that may affect the health and quality of life of MAs with, or at risk for, diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression, Perceived Health Status, and Glucose Control among Mexican Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158883-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression, Perceived Health Status, and Glucose Control among Mexican Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martinez, Nelda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at El Paso</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1101 N. Campbell St., El Paso, TX, 79902, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">915-747-7251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ncmartinez@utep.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.C. Martinez, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes and depression are closely associated but few studies have explored this correlation among Mexican Americans (MA). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between depression and diabetes among MAs and explore these findings in association with perceived health status and glucose control. Method(s): A convenience sample of 57 MA participating in a genetic study (28 with diabetes and 29 without) were asked to complete either the Spanish or English language version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) and the Self-Health Rating (SHR) scales. Fasting blood samples were obtained to determine overall glucose control (Hemoglobin A1c level). Results: Subjects in both groups were similar in age, gender, and marital status while those with diabetes had lower levels of education and income. Those with diabetes scored significantly higher on the CES-D versus those without diabetes (mean=20.64, SD=9.37 vs. 14.03, SD=7.46; t=-2.87, p&lt;.006) reflecting they experienced more feelings or behaviors associated with depression. Per scale item, both groups yielded similar results with scoring the highest and non-significant difference on Q16 &quot;I enjoyed life&quot; (mean=2.50, SD=.745 vs. 2.38, SD=1.05; t=-.499, p&lt;.62) as well as the lowest on Q9 &quot;I thought my life had been a failure&quot; (mean=.103, SD=.745 vs. .138, SD=.409; t=-1.348, p&lt;.18). Those with diabetes had a significantly higher HgA1c level versus those without diabetes (mean=7.40, SD=1.31 vs. 5.86, SD=.35; t=-6.09, p&lt;.0001)reflecting more poor glucose control; they also perceived their health status significantly lower (fair-good) than those without diabetes (good-very good) (mean=3.32, SD=.945 vs. 2.55, SD=1.05; t=-2.898, p&lt;.005). However, their perceived health status was not significantly associated with their glucose control (r=.268, p&lt;.178) but was with their level of depression (r=.59, p&lt;.0006). Conclusion: Mexican Americans with diabetes reflected a higher level of depression, more poor glucose control, as well as a lower self-rating of their health when compared to those without diabetes. Key interventions require attention to the role of socio-cultural factors that may affect the health and quality of life of MAs with, or at risk for, diabetes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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