2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158886
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound: A Community Dog-Walking Program for Families
Abstract:
Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound: A Community Dog-Walking Program for Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:McKenney, Charlotte
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri- Columbia
Contact Address:900 East Campus Drive, Columbia, MO, 65212, USA
Contact Telephone:573 356-8057
Co-Authors:R.A. Johnson, Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; R.A. Johnson, C.A. McKenney, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Background: The CDC includes physical inactivity as a major modifiable risk factor for preventing heart disease and promoting health. During the past 20 years there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States. Missouri has a reported prevalence of obesity at 27.5%. Research shows the benefits of people walking dogs to lose weight and remain active. Our previous research showed that adherence to a dog-walking program was motivated by commitment to helping 'loaner' dogs get exercise. The aim of the present study was to engage adults in shelter dog-walking to increase their physical activity even outside of the dog-walking. Methods: In Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound (WAH), adults participated in weekly, one-hour walks with shelter dogs that were selected for amicable personalities and walking ability. Participants were led through a brief group warm-up exercise sequence and walked the dogs on a nature trail. We studied self-reported health problems, pet ownership, weight, body mass index and physical activity stage of change. Results: One hundred sixty-two adults participated (30 males and 132 females), ranging from age 19 to 85 (Mean=40, SD 15.73). The most commonly self-reported health problems were depression (n=16), headache (n=16), and anxiety (n=9). There was a significant increase in Physical Activity Stage of Change (difference scores from pre to post compared, p<0.001, two sided). The mean score for the group was 4.57 on the pretest and 5.01 on the post-test. Thus participants went from doing vigorous exercise less than 3 times per week or moderate exercise less than 5 times per week to doing 30 minutes a day of moderate exercise 5 or more days per week. Conclusions: The Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound program has been successful in giving adults and families with children a way to increase their physical activity. Participants reported being more aware of options at home for increased physical activity, by walking, running, or doing yard and household cleaning projects. Other cities and communities could use this program with existing local facilities to create opportunities for increasing physical activity of their citizens.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWalk a Hound, Lose a Pound: A Community Dog-Walking Program for Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158886-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound: A Community Dog-Walking Program for Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKenney, Charlotte</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri- Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">900 East Campus Drive, Columbia, MO, 65212, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 356-8057</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mckenneyc@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.A. Johnson, Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; R.A. Johnson, C.A. McKenney, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The CDC includes physical inactivity as a major modifiable risk factor for preventing heart disease and promoting health. During the past 20 years there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States. Missouri has a reported prevalence of obesity at 27.5%. Research shows the benefits of people walking dogs to lose weight and remain active. Our previous research showed that adherence to a dog-walking program was motivated by commitment to helping 'loaner' dogs get exercise. The aim of the present study was to engage adults in shelter dog-walking to increase their physical activity even outside of the dog-walking. Methods: In Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound (WAH), adults participated in weekly, one-hour walks with shelter dogs that were selected for amicable personalities and walking ability. Participants were led through a brief group warm-up exercise sequence and walked the dogs on a nature trail. We studied self-reported health problems, pet ownership, weight, body mass index and physical activity stage of change. Results: One hundred sixty-two adults participated (30 males and 132 females), ranging from age 19 to 85 (Mean=40, SD 15.73). The most commonly self-reported health problems were depression (n=16), headache (n=16), and anxiety (n=9). There was a significant increase in Physical Activity Stage of Change (difference scores from pre to post compared, p&lt;0.001, two sided). The mean score for the group was 4.57 on the pretest and 5.01 on the post-test. Thus participants went from doing vigorous exercise less than 3 times per week or moderate exercise less than 5 times per week to doing 30 minutes a day of moderate exercise 5 or more days per week. Conclusions: The Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound program has been successful in giving adults and families with children a way to increase their physical activity. Participants reported being more aware of options at home for increased physical activity, by walking, running, or doing yard and household cleaning projects. Other cities and communities could use this program with existing local facilities to create opportunities for increasing physical activity of their citizens.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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