Spouse Caregivers in Dementia: The Role of Finding Meaning as a Mediator between Burden and Health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158887
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spouse Caregivers in Dementia: The Role of Finding Meaning as a Mediator between Burden and Health
Abstract:
Spouse Caregivers in Dementia: The Role of Finding Meaning as a Mediator between Burden and Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:McLennon, Susan, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1111 Middle Dr., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-0459
Co-Authors:S. McLennnon, B. Habermann, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; M. Rice, , University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;
Objective: Caring for a spouse with dementia is stressful and may result in harmful effects on caregiver health and increase the risk for mortality. Spouse caregivers in dementia are at greater risk for negative outcomes than others. The stress of caregiving has been conceptualized as burden, defined as the caregiver's appraisal of their situation. Guided by the Alzheimer's Caregiver Stress model, finding meaning in caregiving as a way of coping and potential mediator between caregiver burden and caregiver physical and mental health was examined in this study. Methods: Data were from a cross-sectional, correlational study in a convenience sample of 84 community-residing spouse caregivers who were recruited from North-Central Florida. The sample consisted primarily of women (n = 50), with a mean age of 77. Measures included the Zarit Burden Interview, the Finding Meaning through Caregiving Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36v2. Results: Burden significantly predicted caregiver mental health but not physical health. Mediation tests suggested that finding meaning partially reduces the effect of caregiver burden on mental health. Further analysis of each of the four subscales of the mental health summary score indicated that the four-item vitality subscale was the most affected by the reduction in burden by finding meaning. Discussion: Spouse caregivers may experience declines in mental health due to caregiver burden. However, spouses who find their caregiving experiences to be meaningful may experience less caregiver burden and better mental health outcomes. Because of the increased risk for caregiver mortality, further investigation of finding meaning in caregiving as a coping strategy is warranted. For example, methods to improve day-to-day coping and assistance with feelings of loss may be beneficial. Uncovering specific aspects of finding meaning that could reduce burden appraisal and contribute to greater vitality would be beneficial for this vulnerable group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpouse Caregivers in Dementia: The Role of Finding Meaning as a Mediator between Burden and Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158887-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spouse Caregivers in Dementia: The Role of Finding Meaning as a Mediator between Burden and Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McLennon, Susan, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Dr., Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-0459</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smclenno@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. McLennnon, B. Habermann, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; M. Rice, , University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Caring for a spouse with dementia is stressful and may result in harmful effects on caregiver health and increase the risk for mortality. Spouse caregivers in dementia are at greater risk for negative outcomes than others. The stress of caregiving has been conceptualized as burden, defined as the caregiver's appraisal of their situation. Guided by the Alzheimer's Caregiver Stress model, finding meaning in caregiving as a way of coping and potential mediator between caregiver burden and caregiver physical and mental health was examined in this study. Methods: Data were from a cross-sectional, correlational study in a convenience sample of 84 community-residing spouse caregivers who were recruited from North-Central Florida. The sample consisted primarily of women (n = 50), with a mean age of 77. Measures included the Zarit Burden Interview, the Finding Meaning through Caregiving Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36v2. Results: Burden significantly predicted caregiver mental health but not physical health. Mediation tests suggested that finding meaning partially reduces the effect of caregiver burden on mental health. Further analysis of each of the four subscales of the mental health summary score indicated that the four-item vitality subscale was the most affected by the reduction in burden by finding meaning. Discussion: Spouse caregivers may experience declines in mental health due to caregiver burden. However, spouses who find their caregiving experiences to be meaningful may experience less caregiver burden and better mental health outcomes. Because of the increased risk for caregiver mortality, further investigation of finding meaning in caregiving as a coping strategy is warranted. For example, methods to improve day-to-day coping and assistance with feelings of loss may be beneficial. Uncovering specific aspects of finding meaning that could reduce burden appraisal and contribute to greater vitality would be beneficial for this vulnerable group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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