The Reliability and Validity of Self-Efficacy Instruments in African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158890
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Reliability and Validity of Self-Efficacy Instruments in African American Women
Abstract:
The Reliability and Validity of Self-Efficacy Instruments in African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Murrock, Carolyn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325, USA
Contact Telephone:330-472-9341
Co-Authors:C.J. Murrock, College of Nursing, The University of Akron, Akron, OH;
The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) Scale and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) Scale in a sample of 126 middle aged African American women. Social Cognitive Theory postulates that behavior change is both behavior and population specific requiring self-efficacy instruments to be suitable for a specific behavior, situation, and population. Thus, it is important to determine if self-efficacy scales originally developed and tested in older Caucasian female adults are reliable and valid for other populations. The psychometric properties of the SEE and OEE examined were reliability estimation using Cronbach's alpha and construct validity using hypothesis testing and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) was used to determine construct validity of the SEE and OEE as it had the most gender and culturally appropriate measures of physical activity. The results indicated that both scales demonstrated support for internal consistency (SEE = Cronbach's alpha = .93; OEE = Cronbach's alpha = .95). For hypothesis testing, there was partial evidence of construct validity as the SEE was significantly related to PASE (r = .24; p <.01) but the OEE was not significantly related to PASE (r = .14; p = .12). However, CFA supported construct validity of both scales based on model fit statistics (chi² = 212.37, df=130, CFI=.96, NNFI=.95, RMSEA=.071). These findings support the behavior and population specific properties of the SEE and OEE scales related to physical activity in middle aged African American women. In the future, physical activity interventions based on Social Cognitive Theory will help to explain the mechanisms of how and why physical activity interventions are successful in African American women when including reliable and valid measures of self-efficacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Reliability and Validity of Self-Efficacy Instruments in African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158890-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Reliability and Validity of Self-Efficacy Instruments in African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murrock, Carolyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-472-9341</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cj24@windstream.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.J. Murrock, College of Nursing, The University of Akron, Akron, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) Scale and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) Scale in a sample of 126 middle aged African American women. Social Cognitive Theory postulates that behavior change is both behavior and population specific requiring self-efficacy instruments to be suitable for a specific behavior, situation, and population. Thus, it is important to determine if self-efficacy scales originally developed and tested in older Caucasian female adults are reliable and valid for other populations. The psychometric properties of the SEE and OEE examined were reliability estimation using Cronbach's alpha and construct validity using hypothesis testing and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) was used to determine construct validity of the SEE and OEE as it had the most gender and culturally appropriate measures of physical activity. The results indicated that both scales demonstrated support for internal consistency (SEE = Cronbach's alpha = .93; OEE = Cronbach's alpha = .95). For hypothesis testing, there was partial evidence of construct validity as the SEE was significantly related to PASE (r = .24; p &lt;.01) but the OEE was not significantly related to PASE (r = .14; p = .12). However, CFA supported construct validity of both scales based on model fit statistics (chi&sup2; = 212.37, df=130, CFI=.96, NNFI=.95, RMSEA=.071). These findings support the behavior and population specific properties of the SEE and OEE scales related to physical activity in middle aged African American women. In the future, physical activity interventions based on Social Cognitive Theory will help to explain the mechanisms of how and why physical activity interventions are successful in African American women when including reliable and valid measures of self-efficacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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