Predictors of Self-Reported Memory Problems in Patients with Ovarian Cancer Who Have Received Chemotherapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Self-Reported Memory Problems in Patients with Ovarian Cancer Who Have Received Chemotherapy
Abstract:
Predictors of Self-Reported Memory Problems in Patients with Ovarian Cancer Who Have Received Chemotherapy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Myers, Jamie, RN, MN, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas School of Nursing
Contact Address:10613 Riverview, Edwardsville, KS, 66111, USA
Contact Telephone:9134495996
Co-Authors:J.S. Myers, V.D. Sousa, School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS; H.S. Donovan, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA;
Changes in cognitive function, including memory problems, are recognized as serious potential sequelae to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the association between self-report of memory problems and the most commonly reported concurrent symptoms by women with ovarian cancer who have received chemotherapy. The blended model of the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms and the Conceptual Model of Chemotherapy-Related Changes in Cognitive Function guided the research. The sample of 638 women with history of ovarian cancer who received chemotherapy was drawn from the total data set of 706 women participating in a larger study. Measures included a demographic questionnaire, disease and treatment history survey, and symptom severity index. Participants were highly educated, Caucasian, married females, able to maintain their employment or role as homemakers. The majority was diagnosed with stage III disease and 73% reported memory problems. The linear combination of nine symptoms accounted for 37% of the variance of memory problems(controlling for time since chemotherapy and education level)(R2=.37, R2Change=.34, F(9,595)=35.98, p<.01). Four symptoms were statistically significant predictors of memory problems: fatigue (beta=.18, p< .01), mood swings (beta=.23, p< .01), numbness/tingling(beta=.07, p=.05), and sleep disturbance (beta=.16, p< .01). Results from the Welch t-test for independent samples of unequal size indicated a significant difference between mean scores for self-reported memory problems for participants who received chemotherapy (M=3.04, SD=2.86, n=638) and those who had not (M= 2.0, SD = 2.55, n = 68); t(82.70)=-3.12, p< .01, 95% CI from -1.7 to -.38. Findings suggest that memory problems were common following chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate potential mechanisms underlying these symptom interactions. Patient/family education should include information about the potential for memory problems following chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Self-Reported Memory Problems in Patients with Ovarian Cancer Who Have Received Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Self-Reported Memory Problems in Patients with Ovarian Cancer Who Have Received Chemotherapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Myers, Jamie, RN, MN, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10613 Riverview, Edwardsville, KS, 66111, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9134495996</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmyers@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.S. Myers, V.D. Sousa, School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS; H.S. Donovan, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Changes in cognitive function, including memory problems, are recognized as serious potential sequelae to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the association between self-report of memory problems and the most commonly reported concurrent symptoms by women with ovarian cancer who have received chemotherapy. The blended model of the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms and the Conceptual Model of Chemotherapy-Related Changes in Cognitive Function guided the research. The sample of 638 women with history of ovarian cancer who received chemotherapy was drawn from the total data set of 706 women participating in a larger study. Measures included a demographic questionnaire, disease and treatment history survey, and symptom severity index. Participants were highly educated, Caucasian, married females, able to maintain their employment or role as homemakers. The majority was diagnosed with stage III disease and 73% reported memory problems. The linear combination of nine symptoms accounted for 37% of the variance of memory problems(controlling for time since chemotherapy and education level)(R2=.37, R2Change=.34, F(9,595)=35.98, p&lt;.01). Four symptoms were statistically significant predictors of memory problems: fatigue (beta=.18, p&lt; .01), mood swings (beta=.23, p&lt; .01), numbness/tingling(beta=.07, p=.05), and sleep disturbance (beta=.16, p&lt; .01). Results from the Welch t-test for independent samples of unequal size indicated a significant difference between mean scores for self-reported memory problems for participants who received chemotherapy (M=3.04, SD=2.86, n=638) and those who had not (M= 2.0, SD = 2.55, n = 68); t(82.70)=-3.12, p&lt; .01, 95% CI from -1.7 to -.38. Findings suggest that memory problems were common following chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate potential mechanisms underlying these symptom interactions. Patient/family education should include information about the potential for memory problems following chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:29:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:29:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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