Factors Influencing Korean Women's Use of Mammograms and Pap Tests for Cancer Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158894
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Korean Women's Use of Mammograms and Pap Tests for Cancer Screening
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Korean Women's Use of Mammograms and Pap Tests for Cancer Screening
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Park, Hanjong
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illnois at Chicago
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:312 Chicago Ave. #2D, Oak Park, IL, 60302, USA
Contact Telephone:312-731-1206
Co-Authors:H. Park, E. Lee, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Y. Eun, College of Nusing, Gerontological Health Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF;
Purpose: Both breast and cervical cancers are steeply increasing among Korean women in Korea. However, Korean women's breast and cervical cancer screening rates are much lower than Korean women in the U.S., even though national health insurance pays for a mammogram for women over 40 years and a Pap test for women over 30 years old every 2 years in Korea. The purposes of this study are to (1) describe cancer screening status, (2) examine the relationship between breast cancer and cervical cancer screening behaviors, and (3) identify factors influencing cancer screening behavior among Korean women in Korea. Health Belief Model guided this study. Methods: A convenience sample of 220 Korean women (33-88 years old) was recruited in three urban cities in Korea. Data were analyzed by Cramer's V coefficients, Chi-square test, Pearson's correlation coefficients, and hierarchical ordinal logistic regression. Findings: In the preceding 2 years, 36% of women had had both screening tests; 30% of women had either a mammogram or a Pap test; and 34% of women did not receive any test. Breast cancer screening behavior was significantly correlated with cervical cancer screening behavior. Routine health examination (OR = 1.5) and perceived barriers to mammogram (OR = -1.5) predicted the outcome variable of receiving both tests in the preceding 2 years. Conclusions: Korean women's breast and cervical cancer screening rates are relatively low, although health care access is not an issue in Korea. Therefore, we suggest the development of a tailored program to increase Korean women's cancer screening rates that focuses on decreasing barriers to cancer screening and increasing routine health examination rates. The findings could be also useful for improving cancer screening rates among Korean women in the U.S., as health care accessibility may not increase their cancer screening rates unless specific, targeted interventions are provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Korean Women's Use of Mammograms and Pap Tests for Cancer Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158894-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Korean Women's Use of Mammograms and Pap Tests for Cancer Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Hanjong</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illnois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">312 Chicago Ave. #2D, Oak Park, IL, 60302, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-731-1206</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hanjongpark@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H. Park, E. Lee, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Y. Eun, College of Nusing, Gerontological Health Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Both breast and cervical cancers are steeply increasing among Korean women in Korea. However, Korean women's breast and cervical cancer screening rates are much lower than Korean women in the U.S., even though national health insurance pays for a mammogram for women over 40 years and a Pap test for women over 30 years old every 2 years in Korea. The purposes of this study are to (1) describe cancer screening status, (2) examine the relationship between breast cancer and cervical cancer screening behaviors, and (3) identify factors influencing cancer screening behavior among Korean women in Korea. Health Belief Model guided this study. Methods: A convenience sample of 220 Korean women (33-88 years old) was recruited in three urban cities in Korea. Data were analyzed by Cramer's V coefficients, Chi-square test, Pearson's correlation coefficients, and hierarchical ordinal logistic regression. Findings: In the preceding 2 years, 36% of women had had both screening tests; 30% of women had either a mammogram or a Pap test; and 34% of women did not receive any test. Breast cancer screening behavior was significantly correlated with cervical cancer screening behavior. Routine health examination (OR = 1.5) and perceived barriers to mammogram (OR = -1.5) predicted the outcome variable of receiving both tests in the preceding 2 years. Conclusions: Korean women's breast and cervical cancer screening rates are relatively low, although health care access is not an issue in Korea. Therefore, we suggest the development of a tailored program to increase Korean women's cancer screening rates that focuses on decreasing barriers to cancer screening and increasing routine health examination rates. The findings could be also useful for improving cancer screening rates among Korean women in the U.S., as health care accessibility may not increase their cancer screening rates unless specific, targeted interventions are provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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