2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158895
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Prevention Beliefs among Hispanics
Abstract:
Hypertension Prevention Beliefs among Hispanics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Peters, Rosalind, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:5557 Cass Ave., Room 358, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-0342
Co-Authors:R.M. Peters, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; K.J. Aroian, N. Rudner, L. Waser, College of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL;
Problem: Despite high prevalence rates of hypertension (HTN), prehypertension, and risk factors for developing HTN (e.g., obesity, lack of exercise), Hispanics have lower rates of HTN awareness, treatment, and control than non-Hispanic Blacks or Whites. Understanding factors influencing health-risk behaviors is preliminary to developing effective strategies for health promotion. Theory: An expanded version of the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to inductively explore attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control beliefs influencing HTN-prevention behaviors among Hispanics. Method: This qualitative study recruited 17 self-identified Hispanics to participate in one of four focus groups. The groups were stratified by socioeconomic status to capture potentially different perspectives, which unintentionally yielded two groups: participants born/ reared in the US and relatively recent arrivals to mainland US. Results: Content analysis of data revealed participants had an overall positive attitude toward HTN prevention. They were fairly knowledgeable about causes and consequences of HTN, and identified the internet and Spanish language newspapers as providing ample information. Limited resources (perceived behavioral control) included lack of time to exercise or prepare healthy meals, lack of health insurance, and lack of finances to purchase healthy food. The expanded concept of subjective norm found cultural expectations to be an important barrier. Cultural expectations and values included the significance of food as a marker of ethnicity, hospitality, and affection; valuing social interaction over solitary activities like exercising; trying to typify the ideal Hispanic; fatalism; and not seeking health care unless symptomatic were noted as barriers. Depending on country of origin, another cultural expectation was that being overweight was normative. Implications: Findings suggest that nursing interventions should build on cultural strengths. Dietary suggestions could adapt recipes so that ethnic foods are healthy, affordable, and easily prepared. Activity recommendations designed to engage existing personal networks of family and friends for group rather than solitary exercise may be more easily adopted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Prevention Beliefs among Hispanicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158895-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Prevention Beliefs among Hispanics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5557 Cass Ave., Room 358, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-0342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rpeters@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.M. Peters, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; K.J. Aroian, N. Rudner, L. Waser, College of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Despite high prevalence rates of hypertension (HTN), prehypertension, and risk factors for developing HTN (e.g., obesity, lack of exercise), Hispanics have lower rates of HTN awareness, treatment, and control than non-Hispanic Blacks or Whites. Understanding factors influencing health-risk behaviors is preliminary to developing effective strategies for health promotion. Theory: An expanded version of the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to inductively explore attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control beliefs influencing HTN-prevention behaviors among Hispanics. Method: This qualitative study recruited 17 self-identified Hispanics to participate in one of four focus groups. The groups were stratified by socioeconomic status to capture potentially different perspectives, which unintentionally yielded two groups: participants born/ reared in the US and relatively recent arrivals to mainland US. Results: Content analysis of data revealed participants had an overall positive attitude toward HTN prevention. They were fairly knowledgeable about causes and consequences of HTN, and identified the internet and Spanish language newspapers as providing ample information. Limited resources (perceived behavioral control) included lack of time to exercise or prepare healthy meals, lack of health insurance, and lack of finances to purchase healthy food. The expanded concept of subjective norm found cultural expectations to be an important barrier. Cultural expectations and values included the significance of food as a marker of ethnicity, hospitality, and affection; valuing social interaction over solitary activities like exercising; trying to typify the ideal Hispanic; fatalism; and not seeking health care unless symptomatic were noted as barriers. Depending on country of origin, another cultural expectation was that being overweight was normative. Implications: Findings suggest that nursing interventions should build on cultural strengths. Dietary suggestions could adapt recipes so that ethnic foods are healthy, affordable, and easily prepared. Activity recommendations designed to engage existing personal networks of family and friends for group rather than solitary exercise may be more easily adopted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.