2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Homebound Women's Experience of Reaching Help Quickly
Abstract:
Older Homebound Women's Experience of Reaching Help Quickly
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN, FGSA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:S424 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573 875-5163
Co-Authors:E.J. Porter, , University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;
Annually in the U.S., about 300,000 older persons living alone cannot contact help after a fall or incapacitating illness, but relatively few subscribe to a personal emergency response system (PERS). Little is known about the experience of reaching help quickly (RHQ). The purpose of this longitudinal phenomenological study, grounded in non-equilibrium systems theory, was to describe the RHQ experience of old homebound women. Of the study's three aims, this aim is addressed: To discern the phenomena of the RHQ experience for the sample and to compare the RHQ experience of PERS subscribers and non-subscribers. The sample (N = 40, aged 85-96) was stratified into Group #1 (n = 19, non-PERS subscribers) and Group #2 (n = 21, PERS subscribers). Over 18 months each woman had in-home interviews (range 1-5, average 3) with monthly telephone calls. Data of interest, obtained through open-ended questions, were perceptions, actions, and intentions relative to RHQ. The investigator's descriptive phenomenological method guided analysis. The overall phenomena of the RHQ experience were: (a) recognizing my need for an RHQ device to sustain myself at home, (b) negotiating reliance on people to reach quickly if I need help, and (c) reducing my risk of being unable to contact help quickly. Compared to non-subscribers, more subscribers perceived a need for a PERS-like device. Some voiced considerable reliance upon it; others did not like to wear the PERS button or were averse to sequelae of using it. Most subscribers did not intend to routinely use the PERS to RHQ. Like non-subscribers, they preferred to telephone specific people. Few women had discussed RHQ with anyone. Old homebound women need ongoing assistance to be prepared to RHQ. Assessment and interventions for RHQ should be priorities of gerontological nursing; detailed suggestions for both are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Homebound Women's Experience of Reaching Help Quicklyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158896-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Homebound Women's Experience of Reaching Help Quickly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Porter, Eileen, PhD, RN, FGSA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S424 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 875-5163</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">PorterEJ@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E.J. Porter, , University of Missouri, Columbia, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Annually in the U.S., about 300,000 older persons living alone cannot contact help after a fall or incapacitating illness, but relatively few subscribe to a personal emergency response system (PERS). Little is known about the experience of reaching help quickly (RHQ). The purpose of this longitudinal phenomenological study, grounded in non-equilibrium systems theory, was to describe the RHQ experience of old homebound women. Of the study's three aims, this aim is addressed: To discern the phenomena of the RHQ experience for the sample and to compare the RHQ experience of PERS subscribers and non-subscribers. The sample (N = 40, aged 85-96) was stratified into Group #1 (n = 19, non-PERS subscribers) and Group #2 (n = 21, PERS subscribers). Over 18 months each woman had in-home interviews (range 1-5, average 3) with monthly telephone calls. Data of interest, obtained through open-ended questions, were perceptions, actions, and intentions relative to RHQ. The investigator's descriptive phenomenological method guided analysis. The overall phenomena of the RHQ experience were: (a) recognizing my need for an RHQ device to sustain myself at home, (b) negotiating reliance on people to reach quickly if I need help, and (c) reducing my risk of being unable to contact help quickly. Compared to non-subscribers, more subscribers perceived a need for a PERS-like device. Some voiced considerable reliance upon it; others did not like to wear the PERS button or were averse to sequelae of using it. Most subscribers did not intend to routinely use the PERS to RHQ. Like non-subscribers, they preferred to telephone specific people. Few women had discussed RHQ with anyone. Old homebound women need ongoing assistance to be prepared to RHQ. Assessment and interventions for RHQ should be priorities of gerontological nursing; detailed suggestions for both are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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