Developing Global Health Leaders in Professional Nursing: A Cross-Sectional Follow-Up Survey of the Experiences of International Nurses with Graduate Degrees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158897
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Global Health Leaders in Professional Nursing: A Cross-Sectional Follow-Up Survey of the Experiences of International Nurses with Graduate Degrees
Abstract:
Developing Global Health Leaders in Professional Nursing: A Cross-Sectional Follow-Up Survey of the Experiences of International Nurses with Graduate Degrees
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Prasertsri, Nusara, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-2081
Co-Authors:N. Prasertsri, B.J. McElmurry, Global Health Leadership, College of Nursing , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Aims: The enrollment of international students in graduate nursing programs has gradually increased in schools of nursing across the United States over the past two decades. One of the goals for international students in graduate nursing programs is to prepare leaders who can use their expertise to guide and address health, research, education, practice, and policy needs globally. However, little is known about how international graduates are succeeding as effective global health leaders and professionals following graduation and/or the return home. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of international graduates as global health leaders facing pressing health challenges. Methods: The cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of 84 international graduated nurses from 25 countries who graduated from the College of Nursing, UIC from 1972-2008. The scale questionnaires survey with opened ended questions was sent by electronic mail address to 84 international graduates and 62 electronic mail addresses were successfully sent. Results: Thirty of the 62 graduates from 10 countries responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 83% of the international graduates work in Schools of Nursing and, their functions are primarily related to nursing education, 60% established a graduate nursing curriculum with internationalization and globalization considered in those curricula. They incorporate nursing education in nursing practice and research in various proportions. Overall, 54% reported they continue to conduct health research on topics related to their dissertation, and 30 % reported a change in health research topics to relevant and achievable priorities for health issues in their countries. Also, 70% of the respondents engage in addressing health challenges worldwide, and are focusing on achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Conclusions: Narrative experiences from international graduates who returned to their home country indicate they lead their country in multiple nursing arenas to solve health problems. Their health advocacy focuses on their nation and people in other countries.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Global Health Leaders in Professional Nursing: A Cross-Sectional Follow-Up Survey of the Experiences of International Nurses with Graduate Degreesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158897-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Global Health Leaders in Professional Nursing: A Cross-Sectional Follow-Up Survey of the Experiences of International Nurses with Graduate Degrees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Prasertsri, Nusara, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-2081</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nprase3@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Prasertsri, B.J. McElmurry, Global Health Leadership, College of Nursing , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The enrollment of international students in graduate nursing programs has gradually increased in schools of nursing across the United States over the past two decades. One of the goals for international students in graduate nursing programs is to prepare leaders who can use their expertise to guide and address health, research, education, practice, and policy needs globally. However, little is known about how international graduates are succeeding as effective global health leaders and professionals following graduation and/or the return home. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of international graduates as global health leaders facing pressing health challenges. Methods: The cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of 84 international graduated nurses from 25 countries who graduated from the College of Nursing, UIC from 1972-2008. The scale questionnaires survey with opened ended questions was sent by electronic mail address to 84 international graduates and 62 electronic mail addresses were successfully sent. Results: Thirty of the 62 graduates from 10 countries responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 83% of the international graduates work in Schools of Nursing and, their functions are primarily related to nursing education, 60% established a graduate nursing curriculum with internationalization and globalization considered in those curricula. They incorporate nursing education in nursing practice and research in various proportions. Overall, 54% reported they continue to conduct health research on topics related to their dissertation, and 30 % reported a change in health research topics to relevant and achievable priorities for health issues in their countries. Also, 70% of the respondents engage in addressing health challenges worldwide, and are focusing on achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Conclusions: Narrative experiences from international graduates who returned to their home country indicate they lead their country in multiple nursing arenas to solve health problems. Their health advocacy focuses on their nation and people in other countries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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