2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158898
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Behavioral State and Subsequent Feeding Efficiency Among Preterm Infants
Abstract:
Behavioral State and Subsequent Feeding Efficiency Among Preterm Infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Rankin, Kristin, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing
Title:Women, Children and Family Health Science
Contact Address:945 S. Damen (m/c 802), Chicago, IL, 606431, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-1308
Co-Authors:K.M. Rankin, C. Nevarez Flores, C. Medina-Poeliniz, K. Norr, R. White-Traut, Women, Children and Family Health Science, UIC College of Nursing, Chicago, IL;
Purpose: To determine whether infant behavioral state prior to feeding is associated with subsequent feeding efficiency among premature infants. Background: Premature birth places an infant at increased biologic risk for difficulties in feeding. Feeding efficiency is influenced by many factors, one of which may be behavioral state. It has been suggested that infants who are more alert prior to feeding are more successful feeders. Subjects: The data were collected as part of an ongoing randomized control trial designed to improve early growth and development of premature infants born between 29 and 34 weeks gestational age (GA) who also had two or more social-environmental risks such as poverty or minority status. Preliminary data from 56 stable premature infants were included in this secondary analysis. Method: Behavioral state was coded from videotape for the 15 second interval immediately preceding the feeding. Feeding efficiency was determined by measuring the milliliters of formula or breast milk taken from the bottle per minute during the subsequent feeding. Results: The percentage of infants in a sleepy, drowsy or alert state was 48.2%, 23.2%, and 28.6%, respectively. The range of formula or breast milk taken was 0.0-3.30 ml/min for the entire sample. The amount of formula or breast milk taken (in ml/min) by infants in a sleepy state (mean/SD = 0.55/0.64) was lower than infants in a drowsy (1.00/1.10) or alert (1.22/1.12) state prior to feeding (F(2,56)=3.00, p=0.058). Pair wise comparisons revealed a significant difference in the amount of formula or breast milk taken for infants in a sleepy versus alert state prior to feeding (t=-2.20, p=0.039). Conclusions: This study suggests that behavioral state may be a reliable predictor of subsequent feeding efficiency and could be used as a marker of infant readiness when establishing new feeding protocols in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBehavioral State and Subsequent Feeding Efficiency Among Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158898-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Behavioral State and Subsequent Feeding Efficiency Among Preterm Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rankin, Kristin, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Women, Children and Family Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">945 S. Damen (m/c 802), Chicago, IL, 606431, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-1308</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">krankin@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.M. Rankin, C. Nevarez Flores, C. Medina-Poeliniz, K. Norr, R. White-Traut, Women, Children and Family Health Science, UIC College of Nursing, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine whether infant behavioral state prior to feeding is associated with subsequent feeding efficiency among premature infants. Background: Premature birth places an infant at increased biologic risk for difficulties in feeding. Feeding efficiency is influenced by many factors, one of which may be behavioral state. It has been suggested that infants who are more alert prior to feeding are more successful feeders. Subjects: The data were collected as part of an ongoing randomized control trial designed to improve early growth and development of premature infants born between 29 and 34 weeks gestational age (GA) who also had two or more social-environmental risks such as poverty or minority status. Preliminary data from 56 stable premature infants were included in this secondary analysis. Method: Behavioral state was coded from videotape for the 15 second interval immediately preceding the feeding. Feeding efficiency was determined by measuring the milliliters of formula or breast milk taken from the bottle per minute during the subsequent feeding. Results: The percentage of infants in a sleepy, drowsy or alert state was 48.2%, 23.2%, and 28.6%, respectively. The range of formula or breast milk taken was 0.0-3.30 ml/min for the entire sample. The amount of formula or breast milk taken (in ml/min) by infants in a sleepy state (mean/SD = 0.55/0.64) was lower than infants in a drowsy (1.00/1.10) or alert (1.22/1.12) state prior to feeding (F(2,56)=3.00, p=0.058). Pair wise comparisons revealed a significant difference in the amount of formula or breast milk taken for infants in a sleepy versus alert state prior to feeding (t=-2.20, p=0.039). Conclusions: This study suggests that behavioral state may be a reliable predictor of subsequent feeding efficiency and could be used as a marker of infant readiness when establishing new feeding protocols in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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