A Preliminary Examination of Statistical Conclusion Validity in Published Nursing Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158903
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Preliminary Examination of Statistical Conclusion Validity in Published Nursing Research
Abstract:
A Preliminary Examination of Statistical Conclusion Validity in Published Nursing Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Riley, Tracy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Akron, OH, OH, USA
Contact Telephone:330-972-7894
Co-Authors:T.A. Riley, , The University of Akron , Akron, OH; D.S. Shelestak, , Kent State University, Kent, OH;
Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) refers to the provision of care based on the best available evidence, critical evaluation of the evidence within the care-recipient context, and availability of resources to provide that care. Currently, the use of EBP is the standard in many health disciplines and direction for it comes from published scientific literature. Clinicians look to published findings during reviews of the literature to inform their nursing practice. Educators incorporate the latest evidence into course and clinical activities. Researchers use published findings when planning for anticipated studies, when appraising current state of the science in an area, and when or comparing their study findings with those already published. Health professionals reviewing research to inform practice expect valid analysis and interpretation of the data; however, errors in the analysis of data or reporting of findings have been documented. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine analytic quality of quantitative studies published within one randomly selected research journal. All articles published in the year 2007 (N=62) were eligible; however, only 34 (55%) met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected on parameters expected to be in published research reports. Our findings indicate many quantitative studies reviewed from the target journal lacked sufficient description concerning statistical procedures and analyses. Omissions concerning sample size justification (n=13; 59%), procedures for missing data (n=28; 82%), examination of parametric assumptions (n=17; 61%), and indicators useful in determining effect size (n=14; 64%) were prevalent. These findings may be useful to clinicians to caution them about casually accepting research findings. Findings may also be useful for researchers in highlighting the need to adequately describe analytic procedures in the dissemination of quantitative research results. The findings from this preliminary study suggest the science underlying nursing practice can be strengthened when appropriate analytic attention is provided and reported.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Preliminary Examination of Statistical Conclusion Validity in Published Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158903-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Preliminary Examination of Statistical Conclusion Validity in Published Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riley, Tracy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Akron, OH, OH, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-972-7894</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">triley@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.A. Riley, , The University of Akron , Akron, OH; D.S. Shelestak, , Kent State University, Kent, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) refers to the provision of care based on the best available evidence, critical evaluation of the evidence within the care-recipient context, and availability of resources to provide that care. Currently, the use of EBP is the standard in many health disciplines and direction for it comes from published scientific literature. Clinicians look to published findings during reviews of the literature to inform their nursing practice. Educators incorporate the latest evidence into course and clinical activities. Researchers use published findings when planning for anticipated studies, when appraising current state of the science in an area, and when or comparing their study findings with those already published. Health professionals reviewing research to inform practice expect valid analysis and interpretation of the data; however, errors in the analysis of data or reporting of findings have been documented. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine analytic quality of quantitative studies published within one randomly selected research journal. All articles published in the year 2007 (N=62) were eligible; however, only 34 (55%) met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected on parameters expected to be in published research reports. Our findings indicate many quantitative studies reviewed from the target journal lacked sufficient description concerning statistical procedures and analyses. Omissions concerning sample size justification (n=13; 59%), procedures for missing data (n=28; 82%), examination of parametric assumptions (n=17; 61%), and indicators useful in determining effect size (n=14; 64%) were prevalent. These findings may be useful to clinicians to caution them about casually accepting research findings. Findings may also be useful for researchers in highlighting the need to adequately describe analytic procedures in the dissemination of quantitative research results. The findings from this preliminary study suggest the science underlying nursing practice can be strengthened when appropriate analytic attention is provided and reported.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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