Relationships among geriatric nursing education and student nurse attitudes toward and preferences for working with older adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158904
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships among geriatric nursing education and student nurse attitudes toward and preferences for working with older adults
Abstract:
Relationships among geriatric nursing education and student nurse attitudes toward and preferences for working with older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Roberts, Tonya, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:K6/117-T CSC, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-265-8569
Co-Authors:T.J. Roberts, B.J. King, B.J. Bowers, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI;
Aging of the American population will have a profound impact on the knowledge and skill needed by nurses. Schools of nursing are responding by incorporating geriatrics into their curricula. Research has indicated that geriatric education can improve student attitudes toward, but not necessarily their preference for working with, older adults. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among aspects of a nursing program, student nurse attitudes toward older adults, and preference to work with older adults. Conceptual Framework: This exploratory study was guided by empirical findings in the literature. Subjects: Undergraduate nursing students (n=81) enrolled in the first semester of the program were included. Methods: A longitudinal mixed methods design was used. The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People scale and a questionnaire on educational experiences and work preferences were administered at four time points over a two year period. Latent growth curve modeling and paired t-tests were used to describe the nursing program, attitudes, and work preferences over time. Focus groups were conducted to supplement quantitative results. Results: There was no significant difference in starting attitude scores or rate of change across students, with no variation in scores that could be explained with nursing program variables. Between Time 2 and Time 3 older adult work preference increased. Work in a long term care (LTC) settings was consistently preferred least. During focus groups, students identified clinical experiences and geriatric coursework as positively affecting their attitudes and preferences. These experiences also led students to identify LTC work as requiring complex skills which they felt unprepared clinically and administratively for. Conclusions: The results of this study support current efforts to improve attitudes toward older adults with focused geriatric education. Moreover, results suggest a major barrier to recruiting new graduates into LTC is a lack of clinical and administrative preparation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships among geriatric nursing education and student nurse attitudes toward and preferences for working with older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158904-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships among geriatric nursing education and student nurse attitudes toward and preferences for working with older adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Tonya, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">K6/117-T CSC, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-265-8569</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tjbeal@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.J. Roberts, B.J. King, B.J. Bowers, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aging of the American population will have a profound impact on the knowledge and skill needed by nurses. Schools of nursing are responding by incorporating geriatrics into their curricula. Research has indicated that geriatric education can improve student attitudes toward, but not necessarily their preference for working with, older adults. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among aspects of a nursing program, student nurse attitudes toward older adults, and preference to work with older adults. Conceptual Framework: This exploratory study was guided by empirical findings in the literature. Subjects: Undergraduate nursing students (n=81) enrolled in the first semester of the program were included. Methods: A longitudinal mixed methods design was used. The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People scale and a questionnaire on educational experiences and work preferences were administered at four time points over a two year period. Latent growth curve modeling and paired t-tests were used to describe the nursing program, attitudes, and work preferences over time. Focus groups were conducted to supplement quantitative results. Results: There was no significant difference in starting attitude scores or rate of change across students, with no variation in scores that could be explained with nursing program variables. Between Time 2 and Time 3 older adult work preference increased. Work in a long term care (LTC) settings was consistently preferred least. During focus groups, students identified clinical experiences and geriatric coursework as positively affecting their attitudes and preferences. These experiences also led students to identify LTC work as requiring complex skills which they felt unprepared clinically and administratively for. Conclusions: The results of this study support current efforts to improve attitudes toward older adults with focused geriatric education. Moreover, results suggest a major barrier to recruiting new graduates into LTC is a lack of clinical and administrative preparation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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