We are not Crazies: Understanding Parents Experiences Prior To and Following Their Children's Admission to an Intensive Care Unit for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158905
Type:
Presentation
Title:
We are not Crazies: Understanding Parents Experiences Prior To and Following Their Children's Admission to an Intensive Care Unit for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
We are not Crazies: Understanding Parents Experiences Prior To and Following Their Children's Admission to an Intensive Care Unit for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Roscigno, Cecelia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing
Title:Women, Children, and Family Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-996-5801
Co-Authors:C. Roscigno, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Aims: Little is understood about the contextual factors that influence parental and family needs following children's traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the intensive care unit. The purpose of this focused analysis from a broader descriptive phenomenological investigation with parents following children's moderate to severe TBI was to depict the common experiences of a group of parents immediately prior to admission and during their children's ICU stay, so that a family-centered education program could be developed. Methods: Forty-two parents from 38 families across the United States participated in two semi-structured interviews. First interviews were always in person (range = 4-36 months after injury; M = 15.5 months) and second interviews (N = 33 parents) were done in person or by phone (range = 12-15 months following parents first interviews; M = 27 months). Resulting parent themes were organized according to the five structures of caring described by Swanson (1993) (Maintaining Belief, Knowing, Being With, Doing For, and Enabling). Results: Parent themes in relation to Swanson's Theory of Caring are: 1) They are alive, Seeing glimpses of the child I knew, You cannot give up on your child, and Hope is all we have left do not take it away expressed Maintaining Belief; 2) Going on autopilot, as well as all other themes were relevant to Knowing; 3) Longing for the child I knew and Working with those who care expressed Being With; 4) I didn't know what to expect, They thought I knew what they meant, Using all your resources, and What about the rest of our family articulated Doing For; and finally 5) Adjusting your expectations related to Swanson's Enabling. Implications: Organizing parent themes with Swanson's structures of caring, while providing pertinent parent exemplars, helps to elucidate how clinicians can interact with parents in a caring and relevant manner. Findings were used to design a family-centered educational program for a Level 1 Pediatric ICU in the Pacific Northwest and will be used to translate the research findings into critical care practice. More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how clinicians' interactions affect parents while their children are being cared for in the ICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWe are not Crazies: Understanding Parents Experiences Prior To and Following Their Children's Admission to an Intensive Care Unit for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158905-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">We are not Crazies: Understanding Parents Experiences Prior To and Following Their Children's Admission to an Intensive Care Unit for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roscigno, Cecelia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Women, Children, and Family Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-996-5801</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">roscigno@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Roscigno, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: Little is understood about the contextual factors that influence parental and family needs following children's traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the intensive care unit. The purpose of this focused analysis from a broader descriptive phenomenological investigation with parents following children's moderate to severe TBI was to depict the common experiences of a group of parents immediately prior to admission and during their children's ICU stay, so that a family-centered education program could be developed. Methods: Forty-two parents from 38 families across the United States participated in two semi-structured interviews. First interviews were always in person (range = 4-36 months after injury; M = 15.5 months) and second interviews (N = 33 parents) were done in person or by phone (range = 12-15 months following parents first interviews; M = 27 months). Resulting parent themes were organized according to the five structures of caring described by Swanson (1993) (Maintaining Belief, Knowing, Being With, Doing For, and Enabling). Results: Parent themes in relation to Swanson's Theory of Caring are: 1) They are alive, Seeing glimpses of the child I knew, You cannot give up on your child, and Hope is all we have left do not take it away expressed Maintaining Belief; 2) Going on autopilot, as well as all other themes were relevant to Knowing; 3) Longing for the child I knew and Working with those who care expressed Being With; 4) I didn't know what to expect, They thought I knew what they meant, Using all your resources, and What about the rest of our family articulated Doing For; and finally 5) Adjusting your expectations related to Swanson's Enabling. Implications: Organizing parent themes with Swanson's structures of caring, while providing pertinent parent exemplars, helps to elucidate how clinicians can interact with parents in a caring and relevant manner. Findings were used to design a family-centered educational program for a Level 1 Pediatric ICU in the Pacific Northwest and will be used to translate the research findings into critical care practice. More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how clinicians' interactions affect parents while their children are being cared for in the ICU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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