Testing the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida: Mental Health and Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158909
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida: Mental Health and Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes
Abstract:
Testing the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida: Mental Health and Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sawin, Kathleen, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:UW-Milwaukee
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:Box 413, Milwuakee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414 229 5318
Co-Authors:K.J. Sawin, College of Nursing , U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; T.J. Brei, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; A. Heffelfinger, Department of Neuropsychology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; T.J. Webb, Developm
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the risk and protective variables delineated in the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida (SB) to predict mental health and health related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes in youths with SB. Background: While youths with spina bifida (SB) have been found to have challenges in mental health (MH) with higher incidence of depression than their peers, this finding has differed by parent or adolescent report. In addition, the relationship of MH to HRQOL and risk and protective factors has not been well delineated. Methods: 95 youth/parent pairs in this multi-site descriptive study who had complete interview and neuropsychological testing were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted with computer-assisted telephone interviewing. Mental Health (MH) was measured by parent report of the youths' Internal and External Behavior Problems (Child Behavior Checklist) and youths' report of depression (using either the Children's Depression Inventory or the Beck Depression Inventory) an d Self-worth (Harter's Adolescent Self-Perception Profile). HRQOL was measured by the SB HRQOL tool. Analysis: The measurement model using Structured Equation Modeling supported two different MH concepts (parent report of youths MH and youths' report of MH). Higher SES was associated with parents' report of positive MH whereas lower age, positive adolescent beliefs, and fewer secondary conditions were associated with adolescent report of positive MH. The impact of SES and family resourcefulness was mediated by adolescent beliefs for youths' report. Only youths' reported MH health and beliefs were related to HRQOL. The model fit was supported by fit statistics (chi square p=.11, CFI=.95, RMSEA=.06). Clinical Implications. Older youths with SB are at risk for MH problems. Targeting youths' beliefs and the other factors associated directly or indirectly with MH such as family resourcefulness and secondary conditions can impact HRQOL.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida: Mental Health and Health Related Quality of Life Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158909-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida: Mental Health and Health Related Quality of Life Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sawin, Kathleen, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UW-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 413, Milwuakee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414 229 5318</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sawin@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.J. Sawin, College of Nursing , U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; T.J. Brei, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; A. Heffelfinger, Department of Neuropsychology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; T.J. Webb, Developm</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the risk and protective variables delineated in the Ecological Model of Adaptation in Spina Bifida (SB) to predict mental health and health related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes in youths with SB. Background: While youths with spina bifida (SB) have been found to have challenges in mental health (MH) with higher incidence of depression than their peers, this finding has differed by parent or adolescent report. In addition, the relationship of MH to HRQOL and risk and protective factors has not been well delineated. Methods: 95 youth/parent pairs in this multi-site descriptive study who had complete interview and neuropsychological testing were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted with computer-assisted telephone interviewing. Mental Health (MH) was measured by parent report of the youths' Internal and External Behavior Problems (Child Behavior Checklist) and youths' report of depression (using either the Children's Depression Inventory or the Beck Depression Inventory) an d Self-worth (Harter's Adolescent Self-Perception Profile). HRQOL was measured by the SB HRQOL tool. Analysis: The measurement model using Structured Equation Modeling supported two different MH concepts (parent report of youths MH and youths' report of MH). Higher SES was associated with parents' report of positive MH whereas lower age, positive adolescent beliefs, and fewer secondary conditions were associated with adolescent report of positive MH. The impact of SES and family resourcefulness was mediated by adolescent beliefs for youths' report. Only youths' reported MH health and beliefs were related to HRQOL. The model fit was supported by fit statistics (chi square p=.11, CFI=.95, RMSEA=.06). Clinical Implications. Older youths with SB are at risk for MH problems. Targeting youths' beliefs and the other factors associated directly or indirectly with MH such as family resourcefulness and secondary conditions can impact HRQOL.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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