2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158910
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analysis of Outcome Change Scores Using a Large Clinical Dataset
Abstract:
Analysis of Outcome Change Scores Using a Large Clinical Dataset
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:Rochester Center, 859 30th Ave SE, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA
Contact Telephone:507-294-3133
Co-Authors:C.A. Scherb, Graduate Programs in Nursing, Winona State University, Rochester, MN; B.J. Head, J.M. Yurkovich, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; D. Reed, Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Car
There has been a significant focus on the quality of health care in recent decades including a focus on patient outcomes. The Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) has provided nursing with a mechanism to evaluate the effect of nursing interventions on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Patient outcomes are influenced by a number of variables. These variables can be categorized into patient demographics, patient clinical conditions, treatments received, and unit/organizational characteristics. Thus, it is necessary to study the effect of these variables on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe the outcomes of hospitalized older patients. The study analyzed the difference in first and last ratings of commonly used outcomes and the variance explained by age, length of stay, number of nursing diagnoses, and number of nursing interventions on select NOC outcome change scores. This descriptive retrospective study contains a sample of patients, aged 60 - 89, discharged from four hospitals with the primary discharge diagnoses of pneumonia and heart failure (HF) from March 1, 2005 through February 28, 2006. The sample included 897 patient records of individuals discharged with pneumonia and 450 records of individuals discharged with HF. It was found that for the pneumonia population all six of the studied NOC outcomes had positive mean change scores and for the HF population two of the three NOC outcome change scores were positive. The only negative outcome change score for HF was the outcome of Fall Prevention Behavior. Regression analysis revealed that no one study variable was significant in explaining the variance in all of the outcome change scores. The variable, number of nursing diagnoses and number of nursing interventions, were significant in explaining the variance in some outcome change scores. This presentation will further discuss these findings and will discuss the implications for nursing practice and further effectiveness research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalysis of Outcome Change Scores Using a Large Clinical Dataseten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158910-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Analysis of Outcome Change Scores Using a Large Clinical Dataset</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scherb, Cindy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Rochester Center, 859 30th Ave SE, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-294-3133</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cscherb@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.A. Scherb, Graduate Programs in Nursing, Winona State University, Rochester, MN; B.J. Head, J.M. Yurkovich, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; D. Reed, Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Car</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There has been a significant focus on the quality of health care in recent decades including a focus on patient outcomes. The Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) has provided nursing with a mechanism to evaluate the effect of nursing interventions on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Patient outcomes are influenced by a number of variables. These variables can be categorized into patient demographics, patient clinical conditions, treatments received, and unit/organizational characteristics. Thus, it is necessary to study the effect of these variables on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe the outcomes of hospitalized older patients. The study analyzed the difference in first and last ratings of commonly used outcomes and the variance explained by age, length of stay, number of nursing diagnoses, and number of nursing interventions on select NOC outcome change scores. This descriptive retrospective study contains a sample of patients, aged 60 - 89, discharged from four hospitals with the primary discharge diagnoses of pneumonia and heart failure (HF) from March 1, 2005 through February 28, 2006. The sample included 897 patient records of individuals discharged with pneumonia and 450 records of individuals discharged with HF. It was found that for the pneumonia population all six of the studied NOC outcomes had positive mean change scores and for the HF population two of the three NOC outcome change scores were positive. The only negative outcome change score for HF was the outcome of Fall Prevention Behavior. Regression analysis revealed that no one study variable was significant in explaining the variance in all of the outcome change scores. The variable, number of nursing diagnoses and number of nursing interventions, were significant in explaining the variance in some outcome change scores. This presentation will further discuss these findings and will discuss the implications for nursing practice and further effectiveness research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:30:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:30:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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