How health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life encounters.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158912
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life encounters.
Abstract:
How health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life encounters.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Seno, Virginia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:555 S Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:5028527331
Co-Authors:V.L. Seno, , University of Louisville, Lousiville, KY;
This poster illustrates an interpretive phenomenological study which examined how health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life care. The literature indicates that health professionals are largely unprepared, both affectively and cognitively to be-with dying patients and their families in ways that help them. Failing to communicate in emotionally appropriate, purposive and responsible ways creates additional suffering for recipients of end-of-life care. Further the literature tells us what changes are needed in personal and professional practice to support patients and their families effectively in end-of-life care. A five point framework for accepting death and transforming practice, together with Martin Heidegger's structures on inauthentic and authentic being-with dying suggest ways for health professionals to prepare to be-with dying so as to facilitate more peaceful transitions from dying to death. Clinicians interested in first steps toward recovery from the inauthentic condition (flight from death) can consider many prescribed ways to confront death anxiety, and to advance toward an attitude of acceptance and authentic being-toward death.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life encounters.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158912-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life encounters.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Seno, Virginia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">555 S Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5028527331</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">virginia.seno@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V.L. Seno, , University of Louisville, Lousiville, KY;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This poster illustrates an interpretive phenomenological study which examined how health care providers succeed or fail at communicating well in end-of-life care. The literature indicates that health professionals are largely unprepared, both affectively and cognitively to be-with dying patients and their families in ways that help them. Failing to communicate in emotionally appropriate, purposive and responsible ways creates additional suffering for recipients of end-of-life care. Further the literature tells us what changes are needed in personal and professional practice to support patients and their families effectively in end-of-life care. A five point framework for accepting death and transforming practice, together with Martin Heidegger's structures on inauthentic and authentic being-with dying suggest ways for health professionals to prepare to be-with dying so as to facilitate more peaceful transitions from dying to death. Clinicians interested in first steps toward recovery from the inauthentic condition (flight from death) can consider many prescribed ways to confront death anxiety, and to advance toward an attitude of acceptance and authentic being-toward death.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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