2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158915
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Clusters in a Minority Serving Hospice/Palliative Care Setting
Abstract:
Symptom Clusters in a Minority Serving Hospice/Palliative Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Stapleton, Stephen, PhD(c), RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinoins at Chicago College of Nursing
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 South Damen Avenue, MC 802, Chicago, IL, Illinois, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-1922
Co-Authors:S. Stapleton, L. Finnegan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; D.J. Wilkie, Professor & Harriet H. Werley Endowed Chair for Nursing Research, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago Col
Aim: Patients with cancer admitted to hospice/palliative care programs often experience multiple, unrelieved, distressing symptoms, yet insufficient information exists describing the symptom cluster phenomenon in this population. We determined the presence and extent of commonly experienced symptoms reported by adult patients with cancer in urban, ethnically diverse hospice settings and identified symptom clusters. Method: Guided by the UCSF Symptom Management Model we conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from 150 patients (41% male; age range 20-92 [M=59, SD=13.3], 37% Caucasian, 51% African American, Other 12%) enrolled in a RCT. Using pen-tablet computers, participants completed the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS [13-65]), Worst Pain Intensity (0-10 [10 is worst]), Mood State (0-10 [10 is best]), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and Demographic Data Form. We used hierarchical and k-means clustering techniques. Results: Range of scores were: total SDS 15-54, M=35, SD=8.3; worst pain 0-10, M=6.4, SD=3.5; mood state 0-10, M=6.6, SD=2.6. Participants reported fairly good (41%) to very good (18%) sleep quality. There were no significant differences between Caucasian and African Americans on total SDS scores, worst pain, mood, or sleep quality. We identified three symptom clusters: Cluster 1 (Pain-Fatigue) consisted of Fatigue, Pain Frequency, and Intensity; Cluster 2 (General Well-Being) consisted of Appetite, Bowel Problems, Insomnia, Appearance, and Outlook; Cluster 3 (Respiratory-Nausea) consisting of Breathing, Cough, Concentration, Nausea Frequency and Intensity. Conclusion: This is the first symptom cluster analysis in a U.S. sample of minority patients with cancer in hospice/palliative. Our three clusters are similar to clusters found in patients with advanced cancer undergoing active cancer treatment. Usually high SDS and worst pain are associated with poor mood and sleep, these dying patients reported severe SDS and worst pain but relatively good moods and sleep quality. Contrary to previous findings of racial differences in pain, in this setting worst pain did not differ by race. Further research determining symptom cluster stability and the biological interactions of symptoms within the cluster may lead to alleviation of all clustered symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Clusters in a Minority Serving Hospice/Palliative Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158915-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Clusters in a Minority Serving Hospice/Palliative Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stapleton, Stephen, PhD(c), RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinoins at Chicago College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 South Damen Avenue, MC 802, Chicago, IL, Illinois, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-1922</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sstapl3@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Stapleton, L. Finnegan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; D.J. Wilkie, Professor &amp; Harriet H. Werley Endowed Chair for Nursing Research, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago Col</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: Patients with cancer admitted to hospice/palliative care programs often experience multiple, unrelieved, distressing symptoms, yet insufficient information exists describing the symptom cluster phenomenon in this population. We determined the presence and extent of commonly experienced symptoms reported by adult patients with cancer in urban, ethnically diverse hospice settings and identified symptom clusters. Method: Guided by the UCSF Symptom Management Model we conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from 150 patients (41% male; age range 20-92 [M=59, SD=13.3], 37% Caucasian, 51% African American, Other 12%) enrolled in a RCT. Using pen-tablet computers, participants completed the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS [13-65]), Worst Pain Intensity (0-10 [10 is worst]), Mood State (0-10 [10 is best]), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and Demographic Data Form. We used hierarchical and k-means clustering techniques. Results: Range of scores were: total SDS 15-54, M=35, SD=8.3; worst pain 0-10, M=6.4, SD=3.5; mood state 0-10, M=6.6, SD=2.6. Participants reported fairly good (41%) to very good (18%) sleep quality. There were no significant differences between Caucasian and African Americans on total SDS scores, worst pain, mood, or sleep quality. We identified three symptom clusters: Cluster 1 (Pain-Fatigue) consisted of Fatigue, Pain Frequency, and Intensity; Cluster 2 (General Well-Being) consisted of Appetite, Bowel Problems, Insomnia, Appearance, and Outlook; Cluster 3 (Respiratory-Nausea) consisting of Breathing, Cough, Concentration, Nausea Frequency and Intensity. Conclusion: This is the first symptom cluster analysis in a U.S. sample of minority patients with cancer in hospice/palliative. Our three clusters are similar to clusters found in patients with advanced cancer undergoing active cancer treatment. Usually high SDS and worst pain are associated with poor mood and sleep, these dying patients reported severe SDS and worst pain but relatively good moods and sleep quality. Contrary to previous findings of racial differences in pain, in this setting worst pain did not differ by race. Further research determining symptom cluster stability and the biological interactions of symptoms within the cluster may lead to alleviation of all clustered symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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