Is This a Blessing or a Curse: Positive and Negative Aspects of Having Cancer Reported by Head and Neck Cancer Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158918
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is This a Blessing or a Curse: Positive and Negative Aspects of Having Cancer Reported by Head and Neck Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Is This a Blessing or a Curse: Positive and Negative Aspects of Having Cancer Reported by Head and Neck Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Swore Fletcher, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:5760, Omaha, NE, 65330, USA
Contact Telephone:402 253-7955
Co-Authors:B.S. Fletcher, K.L. Schumacher, M.Z. Cohen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; W. Lydiatt, School of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
Purpose: Despite grueling treatment regimens with multiple side-effects and ongoing problems related to body image, communication, swallowing, and socialization, many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors report positive aspects related to their experience with cancer. They describe both positive and negative aspects of life after treatment, which affect overall quality of life (QOL). While QOL in survivors has been examined, a detailed view of the positive and negative changes brought about as the result of HNC and its treatment has not been presented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the positive and negative aspects of life for survivors of HNC. Conceptual Framework: Park & Folkman's meaning-making model of coping, an adaptation of Lazarus & Folkman's transactional stress and coping model, was used as a basis to understand emerging positive and negative responses to treatment. Subjects: This qualitative study included interviews with 15 survivors of HNC who were 2-6 months post treatment. Methods: Data collection included semi-structured interviews, observation, field notes, and memos. Data analysis consisted of line by line coding and constant comparison. Codes were organized into conceptual categories. Results: Both positive and negative aspects of recovery after HNC treatment are present. While survivors described many symptoms and losses, they also described the benefits and that they have reevaluated life, including having time to reflect, listening more to others, and having increased patience. They are able to use meaning-making coping to find the good in a very difficult situation, reframe loss, and enhance their lives. Implications for Future Research: Understanding the benefits and difficulties of the survivors' experience helps the health care professional support the entire person. This focus will lead to important nursing interventions that will be tested in future research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs This a Blessing or a Curse: Positive and Negative Aspects of Having Cancer Reported by Head and Neck Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158918-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is This a Blessing or a Curse: Positive and Negative Aspects of Having Cancer Reported by Head and Neck Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Swore Fletcher, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5760, Omaha, NE, 65330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402 253-7955</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsworefletcher@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.S. Fletcher, K.L. Schumacher, M.Z. Cohen, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; W. Lydiatt, School of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Despite grueling treatment regimens with multiple side-effects and ongoing problems related to body image, communication, swallowing, and socialization, many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors report positive aspects related to their experience with cancer. They describe both positive and negative aspects of life after treatment, which affect overall quality of life (QOL). While QOL in survivors has been examined, a detailed view of the positive and negative changes brought about as the result of HNC and its treatment has not been presented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the positive and negative aspects of life for survivors of HNC. Conceptual Framework: Park &amp; Folkman's meaning-making model of coping, an adaptation of Lazarus &amp; Folkman's transactional stress and coping model, was used as a basis to understand emerging positive and negative responses to treatment. Subjects: This qualitative study included interviews with 15 survivors of HNC who were 2-6 months post treatment. Methods: Data collection included semi-structured interviews, observation, field notes, and memos. Data analysis consisted of line by line coding and constant comparison. Codes were organized into conceptual categories. Results: Both positive and negative aspects of recovery after HNC treatment are present. While survivors described many symptoms and losses, they also described the benefits and that they have reevaluated life, including having time to reflect, listening more to others, and having increased patience. They are able to use meaning-making coping to find the good in a very difficult situation, reframe loss, and enhance their lives. Implications for Future Research: Understanding the benefits and difficulties of the survivors' experience helps the health care professional support the entire person. This focus will lead to important nursing interventions that will be tested in future research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.