The Relationship between Operating Room Nursing Characteristics and Patient Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Operating Room Nursing Characteristics and Patient Outcomes
Abstract:
The Relationship between Operating Room Nursing Characteristics and Patient Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Talsma, AkkeNeel, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:400 North Ingalls, Rm. 4154, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5462, USA
Contact Telephone:734-763-5199
Co-Authors:A. Talsma, C. Anderson, H. Geun, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;
Purpose: The Operating Room (OR) is a high risk patient care setting. Although OR nurses are concerned about patient safety, there is a lack of evidence about the relationship between OR nursing characteristics and processes and patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships using electronic staffing, process and outcome data. Conceptual Model: The Clinical Microsystems framework is used to evaluate how the performance of the OR Microsystem impacts patient outcomes. Subjects: Following IRB approval, staffing and patient information were obtained for all surgical cases performed at an academic hospital in 2008 (n=17,518). Method: The study design is descriptive and correlational. Following extraction, relational database creation and quality checks of the data, the analysis plan includes descriptive analysis of staffing, patient and process data. Examples include information about sponge counts, and post-op complications. In addition, correlations will be tested and where appropriate, regression models will be analyzed. Results: Preliminary results indicate that more than 1000 individual practitioners were involved in direct patient care for OR patients. The number of staff involved in each case ranged from 4 to 37, with a mean of 11. The cases represent 16 specialty services and range in length from 11 minutes to 23 hours. A total of 59,804 separate counts were performed by 371 individual nursing staff members, a large majority of them without process errors. Data quality checking is ongoing, limiting results reporting to date. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that the analysis of data obtained from ERM shows promise for enhanced understanding of the relationship between OR nursing and surgical patient outcomes. A systematic process for aggregation of raw data, the creation of a relational database and quality control measures used for dealing with problems such as missing data, are essential for research validity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Operating Room Nursing Characteristics and Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158920-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Operating Room Nursing Characteristics and Patient Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Talsma, AkkeNeel, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">400 North Ingalls, Rm. 4154, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5462, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-763-5199</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">antalsma@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Talsma, C. Anderson, H. Geun, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The Operating Room (OR) is a high risk patient care setting. Although OR nurses are concerned about patient safety, there is a lack of evidence about the relationship between OR nursing characteristics and processes and patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships using electronic staffing, process and outcome data. Conceptual Model: The Clinical Microsystems framework is used to evaluate how the performance of the OR Microsystem impacts patient outcomes. Subjects: Following IRB approval, staffing and patient information were obtained for all surgical cases performed at an academic hospital in 2008 (n=17,518). Method: The study design is descriptive and correlational. Following extraction, relational database creation and quality checks of the data, the analysis plan includes descriptive analysis of staffing, patient and process data. Examples include information about sponge counts, and post-op complications. In addition, correlations will be tested and where appropriate, regression models will be analyzed. Results: Preliminary results indicate that more than 1000 individual practitioners were involved in direct patient care for OR patients. The number of staff involved in each case ranged from 4 to 37, with a mean of 11. The cases represent 16 specialty services and range in length from 11 minutes to 23 hours. A total of 59,804 separate counts were performed by 371 individual nursing staff members, a large majority of them without process errors. Data quality checking is ongoing, limiting results reporting to date. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that the analysis of data obtained from ERM shows promise for enhanced understanding of the relationship between OR nursing and surgical patient outcomes. A systematic process for aggregation of raw data, the creation of a relational database and quality control measures used for dealing with problems such as missing data, are essential for research validity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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