2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158923
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parents' Management of Children's Pain at Home after Surgery: Phase II
Abstract:
Parents' Management of Children's Pain at Home after Surgery: Phase II
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Vincent, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3213553283
Co-Authors:C. Vincent, Women, Children, & Family Health Science , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Chiappetta, K. Latta, A. Beach, , Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL;
Surgical procedures often leave children with untreated pain which can lead to delayed healing and recovery. Due to shortened hospital stays, parents manage their children's pain at home, yet few investigators have examined parents' ability to assess and treat their children's pain. Investigators have shown that children are experiencing substantial pain at home and that parents are administering inadequate analgesia to relieve this pain. The aim of this study is to compare usual discharge teaching (Phase I) to the Home Pain Management for Children (HPMC) intervention (Phase II) for three days post discharge measuring the following outcomes: pain intensity, amounts of analgesia administered by parents, and participants' satisfaction with pain level. The HPMC education intervention consists of discussion of written materials about the negative effects of pain, pain assessment particularly self-report, and pain management focused on use of analgesics. Huth and Moore's Theory of Acute Pain Management in Infants and Children was used to guide this study. We used the Faces Pain Scale-Revised to measure children's pain intensity. Amount of analgesia administered was determined by calculating the percent of prescribed analgesia administered by parents. Descriptive analysis was used to summarize sample characteristics and outcome variables. Analysis of between-group differences was accomplished with t-tests, Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square and repeated-measure ANOVA. Seventy-six children and their parents participated in Phase I. Parents administered fewer analgesics each day: 62.6% on day 1, 54.7% on day 2, and 44.2% on day 3 although children reported moderate mean pain levels over the three days (M = 3.6-5.2). Most parents (79.5%) and children (72.1%) were satisfied with their pain level. Phase II data collection is in progress. This intervention has potential to improve children's pain relief at home, increase both parents' and children's satisfaction with pain levels, and provides direction for nurses regarding discharge teaching.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParents' Management of Children's Pain at Home after Surgery: Phase IIen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158923-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parents' Management of Children's Pain at Home after Surgery: Phase II</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3213553283</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vincentc@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Vincent, Women, Children, &amp; Family Health Science , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; M. Chiappetta, K. Latta, A. Beach, , Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Surgical procedures often leave children with untreated pain which can lead to delayed healing and recovery. Due to shortened hospital stays, parents manage their children's pain at home, yet few investigators have examined parents' ability to assess and treat their children's pain. Investigators have shown that children are experiencing substantial pain at home and that parents are administering inadequate analgesia to relieve this pain. The aim of this study is to compare usual discharge teaching (Phase I) to the Home Pain Management for Children (HPMC) intervention (Phase II) for three days post discharge measuring the following outcomes: pain intensity, amounts of analgesia administered by parents, and participants' satisfaction with pain level. The HPMC education intervention consists of discussion of written materials about the negative effects of pain, pain assessment particularly self-report, and pain management focused on use of analgesics. Huth and Moore's Theory of Acute Pain Management in Infants and Children was used to guide this study. We used the Faces Pain Scale-Revised to measure children's pain intensity. Amount of analgesia administered was determined by calculating the percent of prescribed analgesia administered by parents. Descriptive analysis was used to summarize sample characteristics and outcome variables. Analysis of between-group differences was accomplished with t-tests, Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square and repeated-measure ANOVA. Seventy-six children and their parents participated in Phase I. Parents administered fewer analgesics each day: 62.6% on day 1, 54.7% on day 2, and 44.2% on day 3 although children reported moderate mean pain levels over the three days (M = 3.6-5.2). Most parents (79.5%) and children (72.1%) were satisfied with their pain level. Phase II data collection is in progress. This intervention has potential to improve children's pain relief at home, increase both parents' and children's satisfaction with pain levels, and provides direction for nurses regarding discharge teaching.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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