2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158924
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Nurses' Beliefs and Pain Management Practices: An Intervention Pilot
Abstract:
Pediatric Nurses' Beliefs and Pain Management Practices: An Intervention Pilot
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Vincent, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3213553283
Co-Authors:C. Vincent, D.J. Wilkie, E. Wang, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Compelling research indicates that pediatric nurses discredited children's pain intensity self report and consistently administered analgesic doses in amounts that were less than those prescribed and recommended. We evaluated the feasibility of the Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol. We created RCP as an innovative, interactive, content-focused, Internet- and Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pre/posttest design, we defined protocol feasibility as: 1) time nurses required to complete RCP; 2) its acceptability to them; 3) % of nurses participating, completing study; 4) number of medical records (MR) obtained with prescribed/administered analgesics; and 5) pre/post difference in scores for nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. Nurses completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Abstracted from MR, we calculated % of available opioid dose administered for all children hospitalized on the unit 3 days before and 3 days after the study. We compared scores with paired t tests. We recruited 30 RNs, 75% of 40 nurses working on unit; 24 (mean age 31& plus or minus 8.9 yrs, 67% BSN, mean yrs pediatric experience 7 plus or minus 9.5) completed the study (80% of recruited, 60% of nurses on unit). They completed RCP and the pre/posttests in 2 hours and agreed that: RCP and PBPQ were acceptable, organized, easy to use and their knowledge about children's pain management issues increased. All children's MR were obtained. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pre to posttest (t(23)=10.27, p<.001) as did simulated practice scores (assessment: t(23)=4.12, p<.001; opioid administration: t(23)=4.80, p<.001). Few children received opioids during the 6 days (1 dose pre and 3 doses post). Our findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of this intervention and study procedures. We have shown that this Internet-based RCP intervention significantly improved nurses' beliefs and simulated pain management practices. The fact that we found a significant improvement with a small sample of 24 nurses and 2-hour program is very promising and warrants a randomized study to determine the effects of the RCP intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Nurses' Beliefs and Pain Management Practices: An Intervention Piloten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158924-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Nurses' Beliefs and Pain Management Practices: An Intervention Pilot</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S Damen Ave (MC802), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3213553283</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vincentc@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Vincent, D.J. Wilkie, E. Wang, , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Compelling research indicates that pediatric nurses discredited children's pain intensity self report and consistently administered analgesic doses in amounts that were less than those prescribed and recommended. We evaluated the feasibility of the Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol. We created RCP as an innovative, interactive, content-focused, Internet- and Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pre/posttest design, we defined protocol feasibility as: 1) time nurses required to complete RCP; 2) its acceptability to them; 3) % of nurses participating, completing study; 4) number of medical records (MR) obtained with prescribed/administered analgesics; and 5) pre/post difference in scores for nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. Nurses completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Abstracted from MR, we calculated % of available opioid dose administered for all children hospitalized on the unit 3 days before and 3 days after the study. We compared scores with paired t tests. We recruited 30 RNs, 75% of 40 nurses working on unit; 24 (mean age 31&amp; plus or minus 8.9 yrs, 67% BSN, mean yrs pediatric experience 7 plus or minus 9.5) completed the study (80% of recruited, 60% of nurses on unit). They completed RCP and the pre/posttests in 2 hours and agreed that: RCP and PBPQ were acceptable, organized, easy to use and their knowledge about children's pain management issues increased. All children's MR were obtained. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pre to posttest (t(23)=10.27, p&lt;.001) as did simulated practice scores (assessment: t(23)=4.12, p&lt;.001; opioid administration: t(23)=4.80, p&lt;.001). Few children received opioids during the 6 days (1 dose pre and 3 doses post). Our findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of this intervention and study procedures. We have shown that this Internet-based RCP intervention significantly improved nurses' beliefs and simulated pain management practices. The fact that we found a significant improvement with a small sample of 24 nurses and 2-hour program is very promising and warrants a randomized study to determine the effects of the RCP intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:31:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:31:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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