The Effect of Multi-Sensory Stimulation on Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease Residing in an Extended Care Facility

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Multi-Sensory Stimulation on Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease Residing in an Extended Care Facility
Abstract:
The Effect of Multi-Sensory Stimulation on Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease Residing in an Extended Care Facility
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ward-Smith, Peggy, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing
Contact Address:2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64018, USA
Contact Telephone:816-235-5960
Co-Authors:P. Ward-Smith, School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; S. Llanque, School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; D. Curran, Administration, LaVerna Village, Savannah, MO;
Background: The cognitive decline and memory loss associated with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) frequently require assistance with activities of daily living and residence in AD specialty care units (SCU). Alternative interventions, such as Snoezelen, are controlled multi-sensory stimulation environments (MSSE) which have the ability to reduce agitation. These interventions are important as federal mandates limit the use of chemical and physical restraints. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective chart review study was to determine if use of a MSSE affects anti-psychotic behavior among individuals with AD residing in a SCU. Methods: Once Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was secured, permission to review the medical record was obtained from the individual identified as the Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA) for targeted residents. All study participants were receiving anti-psychotic medication, with which Medicare mandates that a Psychotic Behavior Assessment Record (PBAR) be maintained. PBAR data were used to determine the effects of using a MSSE. Permission to review 14 charts was obtained for seven SCU residents who did not use a MSSE (control group) and seven SCU residents who had received a median of three MSSE sessions per week (intervention group) during the study timeframe. Results: Participants were primarily female (86%), Caucasian (100%) and widowed (93%). Mean age of the control group was 79.1 years, with an average length of stay in the SCU of 18.3 months. Mean age for the intervention group was 82.7 years, with an average length of stay in the SCU of 23.3 months. PBAR data were obtained from the first month each participant was in the SCU and six months later. Documentation included pacing or exit-seeking behavior (93%), aggressive behavior (50%) and aggressive talking (29%). Conclusions: Residents who utilized a MSSE displayed less pacing or exit-seeking behavior and less aggressive behavior at the second data collection interval. There were no statistical differences for aggressive talking. The use of MSSE should be considered as a non-pharmacological treatment for the behavioral affects of AD among SCU residents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Multi-Sensory Stimulation on Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease Residing in an Extended Care Facilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Multi-Sensory Stimulation on Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease Residing in an Extended Care Facility</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ward-Smith, Peggy, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2464 Charlotte, Kansas City, MO, 64018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816-235-5960</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wardsmithp@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Ward-Smith, School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; S. Llanque, School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; D. Curran, Administration, LaVerna Village, Savannah, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The cognitive decline and memory loss associated with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) frequently require assistance with activities of daily living and residence in AD specialty care units (SCU). Alternative interventions, such as Snoezelen, are controlled multi-sensory stimulation environments (MSSE) which have the ability to reduce agitation. These interventions are important as federal mandates limit the use of chemical and physical restraints. Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective chart review study was to determine if use of a MSSE affects anti-psychotic behavior among individuals with AD residing in a SCU. Methods: Once Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was secured, permission to review the medical record was obtained from the individual identified as the Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA) for targeted residents. All study participants were receiving anti-psychotic medication, with which Medicare mandates that a Psychotic Behavior Assessment Record (PBAR) be maintained. PBAR data were used to determine the effects of using a MSSE. Permission to review 14 charts was obtained for seven SCU residents who did not use a MSSE (control group) and seven SCU residents who had received a median of three MSSE sessions per week (intervention group) during the study timeframe. Results: Participants were primarily female (86%), Caucasian (100%) and widowed (93%). Mean age of the control group was 79.1 years, with an average length of stay in the SCU of 18.3 months. Mean age for the intervention group was 82.7 years, with an average length of stay in the SCU of 23.3 months. PBAR data were obtained from the first month each participant was in the SCU and six months later. Documentation included pacing or exit-seeking behavior (93%), aggressive behavior (50%) and aggressive talking (29%). Conclusions: Residents who utilized a MSSE displayed less pacing or exit-seeking behavior and less aggressive behavior at the second data collection interval. There were no statistical differences for aggressive talking. The use of MSSE should be considered as a non-pharmacological treatment for the behavioral affects of AD among SCU residents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.