How Routine Is Over-The-Counter Drug And Herbal Therapy Use In Patients With Diabetes?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158932
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Routine Is Over-The-Counter Drug And Herbal Therapy Use In Patients With Diabetes?
Abstract:
How Routine Is Over-The-Counter Drug And Herbal Therapy Use In Patients With Diabetes?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Title:Nursing Research and Innovation
Contact Address:9500 Euclid Avenue, Mail Code, P32, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA
Contact Telephone:216-444-7028
Co-Authors:N.M. Albert, M. Modic , J. Bena , S. McIntyre, G. Hinkle , P. Zielinski, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; D. Phillip, NWOCC, Toledo, OH; D. Ross , , Lakewood Hospital, Lakewood, OH;
Introduction: Over-the-counter (OTC) drug and herbal therapies may cause interactions with prescription drugs in patients with diabetes. Data on routine OTC drug and herbal therapy use and predictors of use are poorly understood in patients with diabetes. Methods: Using a prospective multicenter cohort survey design and convenience sample, we examined routine use of OTC drug and herbal therapies, medical background and socioeconomic status. Chi-Square and Fisher exact tests or two-sample t-tests were used to determine univariate predictors of routine OTC drug and herbal therapies use. Independent univariate predictors associated with use were assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: Of 305 subjects at 3 sites, mean age was 64.8 plus or minus 11.5 years; 51% were male, 59% were Caucasian, 64% had equal to or greater than high school education, and 47% were married. All but 46 routinely used OTC drugs; most commonly, acetaminophen (45%), vitamins (31%), antiplatelet (baby ASA; 30%), aspirin (21%), non-sodium based antacid (18%), NSAID (16%), and laxative (10%). OTC users were more likely female, treated by someone other than an internist or endocrinologist, diet-controlled, and had a higher body mass index (BMI), all P<0.001. OTC users were more likely to have arthritis, GERD/ulcer disease, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension; all P less than or equal to 0.05. After multivariable analysis, patients who were diet-controlled were more likely to use OTC therapies even after adjusting for gender, BMI, physician type, hospital/outpatient status and presence of common comorbidities: (odds ratio 4.61; 95% CI 1.50, 14.22; P=0.008). Only 9.5% of subjects used herbal therapies; flaxseed (24%), green tea (21%) and ginseng (10%) were most common. In multivariable analyses, no univariate variables remained significant predictors of herbal therapy use. Conclusions: Patients with diabetes regularly use common OTC drugs to self-treat medical problems, maintain good health, prevent cardiovascular events, or per physician/nurse advice; but seldom used herbal therapies. Routine assessment of OTC drug therapies is advocated and individualized education may be needed if drug-drug interactions are likely.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Routine Is Over-The-Counter Drug And Herbal Therapy Use In Patients With Diabetes?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158932-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Routine Is Over-The-Counter Drug And Herbal Therapy Use In Patients With Diabetes?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albert, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research and Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9500 Euclid Avenue, Mail Code, P32, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-444-7028</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">albertn@ccf.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.M. Albert, M. Modic , J. Bena , S. McIntyre, G. Hinkle , P. Zielinski, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; D. Phillip, NWOCC, Toledo, OH; D. Ross , , Lakewood Hospital, Lakewood, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Over-the-counter (OTC) drug and herbal therapies may cause interactions with prescription drugs in patients with diabetes. Data on routine OTC drug and herbal therapy use and predictors of use are poorly understood in patients with diabetes. Methods: Using a prospective multicenter cohort survey design and convenience sample, we examined routine use of OTC drug and herbal therapies, medical background and socioeconomic status. Chi-Square and Fisher exact tests or two-sample t-tests were used to determine univariate predictors of routine OTC drug and herbal therapies use. Independent univariate predictors associated with use were assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: Of 305 subjects at 3 sites, mean age was 64.8 plus or minus 11.5 years; 51% were male, 59% were Caucasian, 64% had equal to or greater than high school education, and 47% were married. All but 46 routinely used OTC drugs; most commonly, acetaminophen (45%), vitamins (31%), antiplatelet (baby ASA; 30%), aspirin (21%), non-sodium based antacid (18%), NSAID (16%), and laxative (10%). OTC users were more likely female, treated by someone other than an internist or endocrinologist, diet-controlled, and had a higher body mass index (BMI), all P&lt;0.001. OTC users were more likely to have arthritis, GERD/ulcer disease, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension; all P less than or equal to 0.05. After multivariable analysis, patients who were diet-controlled were more likely to use OTC therapies even after adjusting for gender, BMI, physician type, hospital/outpatient status and presence of common comorbidities: (odds ratio 4.61; 95% CI 1.50, 14.22; P=0.008). Only 9.5% of subjects used herbal therapies; flaxseed (24%), green tea (21%) and ginseng (10%) were most common. In multivariable analyses, no univariate variables remained significant predictors of herbal therapy use. Conclusions: Patients with diabetes regularly use common OTC drugs to self-treat medical problems, maintain good health, prevent cardiovascular events, or per physician/nurse advice; but seldom used herbal therapies. Routine assessment of OTC drug therapies is advocated and individualized education may be needed if drug-drug interactions are likely.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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