2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158933
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Copper Status in Early Pregnancy: Link with Preeclampsia
Abstract:
Maternal Copper Status in Early Pregnancy: Link with Preeclampsia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Anderson, Cindy, PhD, WHNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Family and Community Nursing
Contact Address:430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4354
Co-Authors:C.M. Anderson, C. Lauzon, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;
Copper (Cu) is essential for optimal blood vessel development (angiogenesis). During pregnancy, blood vessel development is a dynamic process upon which perfusion to the maternal-placental-fetal unit is dependent. As many women of childbearing age are marginally copper-deficient, the development of placental vasculature may be impaired during pregnancy. It is unknown whether marginal copper deficiency serves as a factor that impairs vessel development and blood flow to the placenta, leading to subsequent risk for preeclampsia. This study was designed to determine the relation between maternal copper deficiency and the development of preeclampsia. We tested the central hypothesis that maternal copper deficiency during the first trimester of pregnancy leads to altered angiogenesis leading to placental insufficiency and development of preeclampsia. Using a prospective design and convenience sampling, nutritional and supplement intake, serum markers of copper status (serum Cu, ceruloplasm, extracellular superoxide dismutase [ecSOD]) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], soluble antagonist to VEGF [sFlt-1]) were obtained from nulliparous women between 10-12 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnancy outcome was determined after delivery through medical record review. Relations between variables were determined by Pearson coefficient. Differences between groups (normotensive, preeclamptic) were determined by student t-test with significance p<0.05. Data are expressed as mean + SEM. Copper intake was adequate (>1.3 mg/day) in normotensive women and those diagnosed with preeclampsia with no significant differences between groups. The incidence of preeclampsia was 19.1%. There were no significant correlations between sFlt-1 or maternal copper status in women with preeclampsia and those who were normotensive after delivery. Findings suggest that in well-nourished women, maternal copper status is not related to altered angiogenesis in early pregnancy or with the development of preeclampsia in later pregnancy. Nursing implications include continued promotion of a balanced diet and mineral supplementation to optimize maternal nutritional status during pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Copper Status in Early Pregnancy: Link with Preeclampsiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158933-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Copper Status in Early Pregnancy: Link with Preeclampsia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Cindy, PhD, WHNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family and Community Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">430 Oxford Street, Room 307, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4354</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindyanderson@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.M. Anderson, C. Lauzon, Family and Community Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Copper (Cu) is essential for optimal blood vessel development (angiogenesis). During pregnancy, blood vessel development is a dynamic process upon which perfusion to the maternal-placental-fetal unit is dependent. As many women of childbearing age are marginally copper-deficient, the development of placental vasculature may be impaired during pregnancy. It is unknown whether marginal copper deficiency serves as a factor that impairs vessel development and blood flow to the placenta, leading to subsequent risk for preeclampsia. This study was designed to determine the relation between maternal copper deficiency and the development of preeclampsia. We tested the central hypothesis that maternal copper deficiency during the first trimester of pregnancy leads to altered angiogenesis leading to placental insufficiency and development of preeclampsia. Using a prospective design and convenience sampling, nutritional and supplement intake, serum markers of copper status (serum Cu, ceruloplasm, extracellular superoxide dismutase [ecSOD]) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], soluble antagonist to VEGF [sFlt-1]) were obtained from nulliparous women between 10-12 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnancy outcome was determined after delivery through medical record review. Relations between variables were determined by Pearson coefficient. Differences between groups (normotensive, preeclamptic) were determined by student t-test with significance p&lt;0.05. Data are expressed as mean + SEM. Copper intake was adequate (&gt;1.3 mg/day) in normotensive women and those diagnosed with preeclampsia with no significant differences between groups. The incidence of preeclampsia was 19.1%. There were no significant correlations between sFlt-1 or maternal copper status in women with preeclampsia and those who were normotensive after delivery. Findings suggest that in well-nourished women, maternal copper status is not related to altered angiogenesis in early pregnancy or with the development of preeclampsia in later pregnancy. Nursing implications include continued promotion of a balanced diet and mineral supplementation to optimize maternal nutritional status during pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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