Using Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB)-Based Nursing Interventions with Clients with Mental Illness and Experiences of Incarceration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158937
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB)-Based Nursing Interventions with Clients with Mental Illness and Experiences of Incarceration
Abstract:
Using Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB)-Based Nursing Interventions with Clients with Mental Illness and Experiences of Incarceration
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Brady, Noreen, PhD, APRN-BC, LPCC
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:FPB School of Nursing
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-1867
Co-Authors:N. Brady, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Increased rates of crime and violence are local, national and international issues contributing to major health crises for individuals, families, and communities. Unfortunately, both perpetrators and their victims often remain inadequately treated: physically, psychologically, and emotionally. Mentally ill individuals are especially vulnerable, finding themselves over-represented both as victims and perpetrators. For most, imprisonment often follows criminal activity occurring while symptomatic and non-medicated. For others, mental illness is first diagnosed and treated while incarcerated; however, treatment often ceases when the sentence is complete and the individual released. Recidivism rates are high as prison treatment is often inadequate and practical preparation for community life, including plans for psychiatric and physical follow-up, are often tenuous. A unitary perspective-based participatory approach, specifically the Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB), is particularly relevant when engaging therapeutically in the community with individuals with both mental illness and a history of incarceration. Using the SUHB theory, each individual is seen to be in constant interaction with the environment, creating a mutual and distinct person-environment energy field pattern. Although the pattern itself can not be seen, manifestations of the pattern may be discerned. For the mentally ill person with a criminal history, destructive, often violent, relationships, as well as loss, abuse, and negative lifestyle choices have often contributed to a life-time pattern of pain. Assisting clients to both recognize their own energy patterns and repattern by consciously creating self-identified positive lifestyle choices, are the essence of SUHB-based nursing practice. This presentation will provide specific examples of nurse-assisted participatory pattern recognition and repatterning by mentally ill clients previously incarcerated. Opportunities for future research will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB)-Based Nursing Interventions with Clients with Mental Illness and Experiences of Incarcerationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158937-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB)-Based Nursing Interventions with Clients with Mental Illness and Experiences of Incarceration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brady, Noreen, PhD, APRN-BC, LPCC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">FPB School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-1867</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nxb7@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Brady, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increased rates of crime and violence are local, national and international issues contributing to major health crises for individuals, families, and communities. Unfortunately, both perpetrators and their victims often remain inadequately treated: physically, psychologically, and emotionally. Mentally ill individuals are especially vulnerable, finding themselves over-represented both as victims and perpetrators. For most, imprisonment often follows criminal activity occurring while symptomatic and non-medicated. For others, mental illness is first diagnosed and treated while incarcerated; however, treatment often ceases when the sentence is complete and the individual released. Recidivism rates are high as prison treatment is often inadequate and practical preparation for community life, including plans for psychiatric and physical follow-up, are often tenuous. A unitary perspective-based participatory approach, specifically the Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUHB), is particularly relevant when engaging therapeutically in the community with individuals with both mental illness and a history of incarceration. Using the SUHB theory, each individual is seen to be in constant interaction with the environment, creating a mutual and distinct person-environment energy field pattern. Although the pattern itself can not be seen, manifestations of the pattern may be discerned. For the mentally ill person with a criminal history, destructive, often violent, relationships, as well as loss, abuse, and negative lifestyle choices have often contributed to a life-time pattern of pain. Assisting clients to both recognize their own energy patterns and repattern by consciously creating self-identified positive lifestyle choices, are the essence of SUHB-based nursing practice. This presentation will provide specific examples of nurse-assisted participatory pattern recognition and repatterning by mentally ill clients previously incarcerated. Opportunities for future research will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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