Responses to Work Complexity: Comparison of Advanced Beginner, Competent/Proficient, and Expert Nurses on Cardiovascular Telemetry Units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158939
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Responses to Work Complexity: Comparison of Advanced Beginner, Competent/Proficient, and Expert Nurses on Cardiovascular Telemetry Units
Abstract:
Responses to Work Complexity: Comparison of Advanced Beginner, Competent/Proficient, and Expert Nurses on Cardiovascular Telemetry Units
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Burger, Jeri
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Contact Address:1621 N. Thomas Ave, Evansville, IN, 47711, USA
Contact Telephone:8122042573
Co-Authors:J. Burger, K. Parker, A. White, Nursing, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN;
The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in how advanced beginners, competent/proficient, and expert nurses prioritize patient care and identify factors that influence reprioritization. This study drew upon Benner's work on novice to expert and built on Ebright's work on nursing work complexity. This qualitative study had a convenience sample of 23 nurses, 8 advanced beginners, 8 competent/proficient, and 7 expert nurses on cardiac/telemetry units at 5 hospitals. The participants and were observed for 2 to 3 hours followed by a semistructured interview. A research team collaborated on the data analysis of the written observations and transcribed interviews. Each researcher identified themes, the team discussed the analysis, and then identified themes related to prioritization across the three categories of nurses. Four themes emerged from the data: cognitive strategies, communication, integration of roles, and response to the work environment. Even though the advanced beginners wanted to help others and work with the patient holistically, they had to focus on getting the required work done. Their organization was linear and interruptions had an adverse effect on their work. The work environment was perceived as stressful and some events were interpreted as a crisis. As the nurses progressed in expertise, they were better able to organize, stacking their priorities to more effectively deal with interruptions and anticipate patient needs. They intervened based on a more holistic view of the patient, communicated more effectively with patients and the health care team, integrated various roles into their work, and were able to do things to keep the unit functioning smoothly. The expert nurses had a fluid and holistic response to the complexity of care. The significance of this study is the identification of several factors that affect the nurse's ability to work productively in today's challenging care environment. It increases understanding of the graduate nurses' perception and response to the complexity and work of nursing. An understanding of these factors provides the basis for intervention studies designed to promote transition of nurses from advanced beginner to competent, proficient and on to expert.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResponses to Work Complexity: Comparison of Advanced Beginner, Competent/Proficient, and Expert Nurses on Cardiovascular Telemetry Unitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158939-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Responses to Work Complexity: Comparison of Advanced Beginner, Competent/Proficient, and Expert Nurses on Cardiovascular Telemetry Units</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burger, Jeri</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1621 N. Thomas Ave, Evansville, IN, 47711, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">8122042573</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jlburger2@usi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Burger, K. Parker, A. White, Nursing, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in how advanced beginners, competent/proficient, and expert nurses prioritize patient care and identify factors that influence reprioritization. This study drew upon Benner's work on novice to expert and built on Ebright's work on nursing work complexity. This qualitative study had a convenience sample of 23 nurses, 8 advanced beginners, 8 competent/proficient, and 7 expert nurses on cardiac/telemetry units at 5 hospitals. The participants and were observed for 2 to 3 hours followed by a semistructured interview. A research team collaborated on the data analysis of the written observations and transcribed interviews. Each researcher identified themes, the team discussed the analysis, and then identified themes related to prioritization across the three categories of nurses. Four themes emerged from the data: cognitive strategies, communication, integration of roles, and response to the work environment. Even though the advanced beginners wanted to help others and work with the patient holistically, they had to focus on getting the required work done. Their organization was linear and interruptions had an adverse effect on their work. The work environment was perceived as stressful and some events were interpreted as a crisis. As the nurses progressed in expertise, they were better able to organize, stacking their priorities to more effectively deal with interruptions and anticipate patient needs. They intervened based on a more holistic view of the patient, communicated more effectively with patients and the health care team, integrated various roles into their work, and were able to do things to keep the unit functioning smoothly. The expert nurses had a fluid and holistic response to the complexity of care. The significance of this study is the identification of several factors that affect the nurse's ability to work productively in today's challenging care environment. It increases understanding of the graduate nurses' perception and response to the complexity and work of nursing. An understanding of these factors provides the basis for intervention studies designed to promote transition of nurses from advanced beginner to competent, proficient and on to expert.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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