2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158941
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Participatory Research: How to Meet the Social Justice Mandate?
Abstract:
Community-Based Participatory Research: How to Meet the Social Justice Mandate?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Canales, Mary, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:105 Garfield Avenue, P.O. Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702, USA
Contact Telephone:715-834-1098
Co-Authors:M.K. Canales, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI;
Community-based Participatory Research, referred to as CBPR, is based on the principles of social justice. Yet while in the field, and within today's world of diminishing research funds, these principles often are at odds with meeting grant goals, achieving required outcomes, especially in terms of "numbers," and disseminating "products." During this presentation the tensions that exist between conducting CBPR within a social justice framework while meeting communities'; needs and desires and adhering to the rules, regulations, and outcomes established by funding agencies will be explored. These issues will be examined within the context of three recently completed research studies with Native Americans in Connecticut (CT). CBPR was the approach used for all three studies because it has been demonstrated to be especially appropriate for research involving Native communities, is compatible with cultural values, and aims to assure the involvement of the community in culturally appropriate manners. For three years, the presenter was a member of a multidisciplinary project team, conducting research and developing culturally appropriate cancer education programs for tribal communities throughout CT. The research was guided by an advisory board, composed of representatives from three tribes in CT, cancer survivors, and a representative from the state's Indian Commission, who is also Native American. Additional Native American cancer survivors were involved in the development and facilitation of cancer programs throughout the state. Attending to the needs and requests of Native community members was often juxtaposed with meeting funding obligations. Funding for the projects was received from two private sources, the Lance Armstrong Foundation and Prevent Cancer, and one government source, the National Cancer Institute. How each of these funding sources influenced the team's ability to conduct CBPR will also be explored. As a nurse researcher and the only health care provider on the project team created additional tensions, particularly related to methodology and evaluation, which will also be examined. In conclusion, recommendations for how to meet community and funding obligations while trying to remain true to CBPR's social justice mandate will be offered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Participatory Research: How to Meet the Social Justice Mandate?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158941-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-Based Participatory Research: How to Meet the Social Justice Mandate?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Canales, Mary, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">105 Garfield Avenue, P.O. Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">715-834-1098</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkcanales@att.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.K. Canales, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Community-based Participatory Research, referred to as CBPR, is based on the principles of social justice. Yet while in the field, and within today's world of diminishing research funds, these principles often are at odds with meeting grant goals, achieving required outcomes, especially in terms of &quot;numbers,&quot; and disseminating &quot;products.&quot; During this presentation the tensions that exist between conducting CBPR within a social justice framework while meeting communities'; needs and desires and adhering to the rules, regulations, and outcomes established by funding agencies will be explored. These issues will be examined within the context of three recently completed research studies with Native Americans in Connecticut (CT). CBPR was the approach used for all three studies because it has been demonstrated to be especially appropriate for research involving Native communities, is compatible with cultural values, and aims to assure the involvement of the community in culturally appropriate manners. For three years, the presenter was a member of a multidisciplinary project team, conducting research and developing culturally appropriate cancer education programs for tribal communities throughout CT. The research was guided by an advisory board, composed of representatives from three tribes in CT, cancer survivors, and a representative from the state's Indian Commission, who is also Native American. Additional Native American cancer survivors were involved in the development and facilitation of cancer programs throughout the state. Attending to the needs and requests of Native community members was often juxtaposed with meeting funding obligations. Funding for the projects was received from two private sources, the Lance Armstrong Foundation and Prevent Cancer, and one government source, the National Cancer Institute. How each of these funding sources influenced the team's ability to conduct CBPR will also be explored. As a nurse researcher and the only health care provider on the project team created additional tensions, particularly related to methodology and evaluation, which will also be examined. In conclusion, recommendations for how to meet community and funding obligations while trying to remain true to CBPR's social justice mandate will be offered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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