Comparison of Cumulative Trauma Experiences and Health Risks Behaviors and Challenges of Two High Risk Groups: Urban African American and Iraqi Refugee Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158943
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Cumulative Trauma Experiences and Health Risks Behaviors and Challenges of Two High Risk Groups: Urban African American and Iraqi Refugee Youth
Abstract:
Comparison of Cumulative Trauma Experiences and Health Risks Behaviors and Challenges of Two High Risk Groups: Urban African American and Iraqi Refugee Youth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Conner-Warren, Rhonda, PhD.,RN, CPNP-PC,BC
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:1405 Shaker Dr., Troy, MI, 48083, USA
Contact Telephone:313-779-2644
Co-Authors:R.L. Conner-Warren , L. Lewandowski, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; R.L. Conner-Warren , L. Lewandowski, , Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI; L. Chido , , Carmen and Ann Adams Department of Pediatric Medicine Wayne Sta
Purpose: Many adolescents in high risk populations experience multiple, significant traumatic events/situations of different intensity and duration that occur repeatedly over time, i.e., Cumulative Trauma (CT). Traumatic experiences can result in post-traumatic stress disorders and poor health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the CT load and adolescents' self-report of minor, major, recurrent and long term health disorders; access to health care; and health behaviors in two high-risk populations: urban low-income African American (AA) and Iraqi refugee adolescents. Design: This secondary data analysis focused on relationships between CT and the health of urban AA and Iraqi refugee adolescents. Procedure: The sample in this study was 175 urban African American and 196 Iraqi refugee adolescents, ages 11-17, who attended youth retreats (4 data collection days) that were held in Fall, 2004 as part of a larger study. Instruments: The Cumulative Trauma Scale (CTS) - Teenage Version was used to assess cumulative trauma load while the Child Health and Illness Profile (CHIP-AE) provided data regarding the adolescent's perceptions of their health and use of health services. Results: The two groups experienced similar, high levels of CT. To identify the relation between CT and self-report of health, including minor and major illness, multiple regression was performed controlling for age, gender and ethnicity. Adolescents who experienced more CT reported significantly poorer self-reported health (beta=-.20, p<.001), more physical discomfort (beta=.31, p<.001), more emotional discomfort (beta=.24, p<.001)), report more acute and minor disorders (beta=.35 & .24 respectively, ps<.001), and report more risk-taking behavior (beta=.17, p<.01). Implications: Results suggest a need for culturally-sensitive interventions to help high risk youth to cope with trauma to improve both their physical and mental health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Cumulative Trauma Experiences and Health Risks Behaviors and Challenges of Two High Risk Groups: Urban African American and Iraqi Refugee Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158943-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Cumulative Trauma Experiences and Health Risks Behaviors and Challenges of Two High Risk Groups: Urban African American and Iraqi Refugee Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Conner-Warren, Rhonda, PhD.,RN, CPNP-PC,BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1405 Shaker Dr., Troy, MI, 48083, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-779-2644</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ae6842@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.L. Conner-Warren , L. Lewandowski, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; R.L. Conner-Warren , L. Lewandowski, , Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI; L. Chido , , Carmen and Ann Adams Department of Pediatric Medicine Wayne Sta</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Many adolescents in high risk populations experience multiple, significant traumatic events/situations of different intensity and duration that occur repeatedly over time, i.e., Cumulative Trauma (CT). Traumatic experiences can result in post-traumatic stress disorders and poor health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the CT load and adolescents' self-report of minor, major, recurrent and long term health disorders; access to health care; and health behaviors in two high-risk populations: urban low-income African American (AA) and Iraqi refugee adolescents. Design: This secondary data analysis focused on relationships between CT and the health of urban AA and Iraqi refugee adolescents. Procedure: The sample in this study was 175 urban African American and 196 Iraqi refugee adolescents, ages 11-17, who attended youth retreats (4 data collection days) that were held in Fall, 2004 as part of a larger study. Instruments: The Cumulative Trauma Scale (CTS) - Teenage Version was used to assess cumulative trauma load while the Child Health and Illness Profile (CHIP-AE) provided data regarding the adolescent's perceptions of their health and use of health services. Results: The two groups experienced similar, high levels of CT. To identify the relation between CT and self-report of health, including minor and major illness, multiple regression was performed controlling for age, gender and ethnicity. Adolescents who experienced more CT reported significantly poorer self-reported health (beta=-.20, p&lt;.001), more physical discomfort (beta=.31, p&lt;.001), more emotional discomfort (beta=.24, p&lt;.001)), report more acute and minor disorders (beta=.35 &amp; .24 respectively, ps&lt;.001), and report more risk-taking behavior (beta=.17, p&lt;.01). Implications: Results suggest a need for culturally-sensitive interventions to help high risk youth to cope with trauma to improve both their physical and mental health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:32:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:32:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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