2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158944
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Self-Management Behaviors of Heavily Comorbid Primary Care Elders
Abstract:
The Self-Management Behaviors of Heavily Comorbid Primary Care Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Corser, William, PhD, RN, NEA-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:416B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-355-0328
Co-Authors:W.D. Corser, K. Dontje, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;
Purpose: There is growing evidence that elderly primary care patients with chronic health conditions frequently struggle to self-manage their daily needs. This exploratory study investigated how elders with more than three chronic health conditions managed their health-related needs between scheduled office visits. Conceptual Framework: This study design was theoretically based on the PI's &A learner-centered environment employs strategic activities that focus on the learner instead of the teacher. Research suggests that the adjunctive use of technology enhances student learning. Elluminate is a new technology that incorporates online access with open classroom discussion. The use of Elluminate, along with other activities, may promote the learner-centered environment. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to examine the use of Elluminate from the learner's perspective, and 2) to explore the activities used to promote the learner-centered environment, which included Elluminate. The research design was qualitative descriptive and the method used an open-ended written survey. Opinions were generated from 15 nursing students in a graduate level health policy class with broad representation from clinical backgrounds and age groups. Data was analyzed using content analysis. Findings indicated an overall positive response to the use of this new technology with individual responses specific to the activities used. One challenge that emerged was the size of small groups for various activities. Findings generated from these students indicated that small groups should be limited in size to three students. Small groups of four or more students presented multiple levels of difficulties for student learning. This finding stands in contrast to typical small group sizes of five to ten per group. The use of Elluminate as a new technology was easily mastered and positively received by these graduate nursing students. The integration of Elluminate as an adjunctive tool appears to provide support for a learner-centered environment. "Competing Priorities Model of Primary Care for Comorbid Patients." Subjects/Methods: A convenience sample of 18 heavily comorbid adults from an academic-based clinic were surveyed and focus group interviewed concerning their self-management behaviors and practices during a series of three-hour sessions. Participants' transcribed comments to five open-ended questions were content analyzed for major conceptual themes, with their electronic medical records abstracted for data concerning their socio-demographic characteristics, chronic conditions, primary care service use patterns, and prescribed medications. Results: Participants had an average of 5.8 (SD 1.34)diagnosed chronic conditions and demonstrated composite comorbidity scores significantly higher than average primary care samples. Their Mean age was 64 years, and they had an average of 14 non-PRN medications prescribed. During the prior 12 months, participants had completed an average of 9.0 office visits (SD 5.46) and made 8.8 unscheduled phone calls (SD 9.23) to their primary care clinic. Participants' self-rated levels of health distress, chronic illness self-efficacy, and office visit provider satisfaction were significantly lower than published non-comorbid samples. Major interview themes included: 1. "adjusting to limitations/losses," 2. "continual re-organization," and 3. "noting so many discrepancies." A dimensional matrix depicting a total of 12 conceptual themes/sub-themes will be presented. Implications for Nursing Practice: These initial results represent the unprecedented circumstances under which many comorbid elders now strive to self-manage their daily health-related needs. The presenter will describe his current and prospective nursing research activities concerning this growing population of primary care recipients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Self-Management Behaviors of Heavily Comorbid Primary Care Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158944-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Self-Management Behaviors of Heavily Comorbid Primary Care Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corser, William, PhD, RN, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">416B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-355-0328</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Corser@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W.D. Corser, K. Dontje, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: There is growing evidence that elderly primary care patients with chronic health conditions frequently struggle to self-manage their daily needs. This exploratory study investigated how elders with more than three chronic health conditions managed their health-related needs between scheduled office visits. Conceptual Framework: This study design was theoretically based on the PI's &amp;A learner-centered environment employs strategic activities that focus on the learner instead of the teacher. Research suggests that the adjunctive use of technology enhances student learning. Elluminate is a new technology that incorporates online access with open classroom discussion. The use of Elluminate, along with other activities, may promote the learner-centered environment. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to examine the use of Elluminate from the learner's perspective, and 2) to explore the activities used to promote the learner-centered environment, which included Elluminate. The research design was qualitative descriptive and the method used an open-ended written survey. Opinions were generated from 15 nursing students in a graduate level health policy class with broad representation from clinical backgrounds and age groups. Data was analyzed using content analysis. Findings indicated an overall positive response to the use of this new technology with individual responses specific to the activities used. One challenge that emerged was the size of small groups for various activities. Findings generated from these students indicated that small groups should be limited in size to three students. Small groups of four or more students presented multiple levels of difficulties for student learning. This finding stands in contrast to typical small group sizes of five to ten per group. The use of Elluminate as a new technology was easily mastered and positively received by these graduate nursing students. The integration of Elluminate as an adjunctive tool appears to provide support for a learner-centered environment. &quot;Competing Priorities Model of Primary Care for Comorbid Patients.&quot; Subjects/Methods: A convenience sample of 18 heavily comorbid adults from an academic-based clinic were surveyed and focus group interviewed concerning their self-management behaviors and practices during a series of three-hour sessions. Participants' transcribed comments to five open-ended questions were content analyzed for major conceptual themes, with their electronic medical records abstracted for data concerning their socio-demographic characteristics, chronic conditions, primary care service use patterns, and prescribed medications. Results: Participants had an average of 5.8 (SD 1.34)diagnosed chronic conditions and demonstrated composite comorbidity scores significantly higher than average primary care samples. Their Mean age was 64 years, and they had an average of 14 non-PRN medications prescribed. During the prior 12 months, participants had completed an average of 9.0 office visits (SD 5.46) and made 8.8 unscheduled phone calls (SD 9.23) to their primary care clinic. Participants' self-rated levels of health distress, chronic illness self-efficacy, and office visit provider satisfaction were significantly lower than published non-comorbid samples. Major interview themes included: 1. &quot;adjusting to limitations/losses,&quot; 2. &quot;continual re-organization,&quot; and 3. &quot;noting so many discrepancies.&quot; A dimensional matrix depicting a total of 12 conceptual themes/sub-themes will be presented. Implications for Nursing Practice: These initial results represent the unprecedented circumstances under which many comorbid elders now strive to self-manage their daily health-related needs. The presenter will describe his current and prospective nursing research activities concerning this growing population of primary care recipients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:33:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:33:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.