2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158951
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Public Health Nursing and Community Results on Built Environments
Abstract:
Public Health Nursing and Community Results on Built Environments
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Gangeness, Jeanine, PhD, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Bemidji State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:1500 Birchmont Dr. NE, #15, Bemidji, MN, 56601, USA
Contact Telephone:218-755-3870
Co-Authors:J.E. Gangeness, Nursing, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN;
Public health nursing is best suited to address the environmental issues that consumers of healthcare face. Expanding public health nursing to include considerations of built environments used for physical activity by community members of all ages by conducting needs assessments with the focus of health promotion and prevention are paramount. This community research described and explained what influenced the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and maintenance of built environments for physical activity of rural communities. Guided with an Ecologic Model this comprehensive case study design in two communities employed multiple methods: 2 women's focus groups (4 total focus groups, N=26) and 1 city council (2 total focus groups, N=8) in each community; individual interviews (N=11); three years of archival data; and two quantitative sidewalk maintenance assessments (conducted during two seasons, winter and summer). Built environments were perceived as being limited in types but as available, as having restricted accessibility, and acceptability as being influenced by safety and maintenance. Maintenance of built environments was influenced by weather issues, designated responsibility for conditions (e.g. private citizen, city, public school, businesses), and influence of local power structures which establish funding priorities. Furthermore, economic resources were limited for both rural communities. Local champions, collaborative efforts (public schools, city, and groups/organizations), and adaptation enabled the rural communities to have some development and ongoing maintenance solutions. Connecting the study results to the physical activity options for the individuals displays how public health nurses can advocate for healthy environments in their respective communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePublic Health Nursing and Community Results on Built Environmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158951-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Public Health Nursing and Community Results on Built Environments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gangeness, Jeanine, PhD, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bemidji State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1500 Birchmont Dr. NE, #15, Bemidji, MN, 56601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">218-755-3870</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgangeness@bemidjistate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.E. Gangeness, Nursing, Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Public health nursing is best suited to address the environmental issues that consumers of healthcare face. Expanding public health nursing to include considerations of built environments used for physical activity by community members of all ages by conducting needs assessments with the focus of health promotion and prevention are paramount. This community research described and explained what influenced the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and maintenance of built environments for physical activity of rural communities. Guided with an Ecologic Model this comprehensive case study design in two communities employed multiple methods: 2 women's focus groups (4 total focus groups, N=26) and 1 city council (2 total focus groups, N=8) in each community; individual interviews (N=11); three years of archival data; and two quantitative sidewalk maintenance assessments (conducted during two seasons, winter and summer). Built environments were perceived as being limited in types but as available, as having restricted accessibility, and acceptability as being influenced by safety and maintenance. Maintenance of built environments was influenced by weather issues, designated responsibility for conditions (e.g. private citizen, city, public school, businesses), and influence of local power structures which establish funding priorities. Furthermore, economic resources were limited for both rural communities. Local champions, collaborative efforts (public schools, city, and groups/organizations), and adaptation enabled the rural communities to have some development and ongoing maintenance solutions. Connecting the study results to the physical activity options for the individuals displays how public health nurses can advocate for healthy environments in their respective communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:33:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:33:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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