Examination of Sleep and Fatigue at Baseline and Treatment One of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Within a Randomized Control Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examination of Sleep and Fatigue at Baseline and Treatment One of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Within a Randomized Control Trial
Abstract:
Examination of Sleep and Fatigue at Baseline and Treatment One of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Within a Randomized Control Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kildare, Cynthia, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH College of Health Sciences
Contact Address:, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA
Co-Authors:A.M. Berger, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
Research has found a correlation between chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment, sleep wake patterns and fatigue. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of individualized sleep promotion plans on patterns of daytime fatigue in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. Specific aims included: (1) Describing fatigue scores of women in an intervention group compared to those in a control group. (2) Describing sleep/wake variables at baseline and chemotherapy treatment 1. (3) Examining differences in sleep/wake variables and fatigue of women in the two study groups. (4) Validating sleep status with innovative new instruments. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model provided the theoretical framework for the study. Eighteen women were recruited for the study. All were post surgery and beginning chemotherapy for stage I or II breast cancer; their average age was 51.5 years and most were married and employed. The women were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups. The intervention group was provided with individualized sleep promotion plans. Data were collected at baseline (two days prior to chemotherapy) and at treatment 1 (at each of seven post chemotherapy days). Sleep status was measured with a self-report diary and confirmed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a wrist Actigraph (c) worn by each subject. Fatigue was measured with the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS). The intervention group was older, had fewer dependents, earlier stage disease, higher performance status and was more post-menopausal than the control group. All study subjects experienced increasing fatigue and no group differences on fatigue were found at baseline and chemotherapy treatment 1. Sleep variables for all subjects were within normal limits except for the number of night awakenings and minutes awake after sleep onset. A significant relationship was found between higher fatigue scores and poorer sleep regardless of group assignment. Information from this study is of value to nurses caring for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments and for researchers seeking new and innovative ways of measuring sleep and fatigue in clinical studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamination of Sleep and Fatigue at Baseline and Treatment One of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Within a Randomized Control Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examination of Sleep and Fatigue at Baseline and Treatment One of Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Within a Randomized Control Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kildare, Cynthia, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cyn.kildare@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.M. Berger, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research has found a correlation between chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment, sleep wake patterns and fatigue. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of individualized sleep promotion plans on patterns of daytime fatigue in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. Specific aims included: (1) Describing fatigue scores of women in an intervention group compared to those in a control group. (2) Describing sleep/wake variables at baseline and chemotherapy treatment 1. (3) Examining differences in sleep/wake variables and fatigue of women in the two study groups. (4) Validating sleep status with innovative new instruments. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model provided the theoretical framework for the study. Eighteen women were recruited for the study. All were post surgery and beginning chemotherapy for stage I or II breast cancer; their average age was 51.5 years and most were married and employed. The women were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups. The intervention group was provided with individualized sleep promotion plans. Data were collected at baseline (two days prior to chemotherapy) and at treatment 1 (at each of seven post chemotherapy days). Sleep status was measured with a self-report diary and confirmed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a wrist Actigraph (c) worn by each subject. Fatigue was measured with the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS). The intervention group was older, had fewer dependents, earlier stage disease, higher performance status and was more post-menopausal than the control group. All study subjects experienced increasing fatigue and no group differences on fatigue were found at baseline and chemotherapy treatment 1. Sleep variables for all subjects were within normal limits except for the number of night awakenings and minutes awake after sleep onset. A significant relationship was found between higher fatigue scores and poorer sleep regardless of group assignment. Information from this study is of value to nurses caring for patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments and for researchers seeking new and innovative ways of measuring sleep and fatigue in clinical studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:33:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:33:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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