2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158961
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Care of Older Adults in Acute Care Settings: Exploring Functional Decline
Abstract:
Nursing Care of Older Adults in Acute Care Settings: Exploring Functional Decline
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:King, Barb, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:UW-Madison
Contact Address:Nursing, Lake Mills, WI, 53551, USA
For many older adults, hospitalization can be a catastrophic event. Effects of illness on an already compromised system can precipitate serious decline and ultimately threaten an elder person's ability to live independently. Inouye, et al (1993) states that 34-50% of elderly patients experience functional decline during hospitalization. Similar percentages were also cited by Palmer, Counsell, and Landefeld (1998) who state that 25-35% of older adults who are admitted to a hospital for a medical illness lose independent function in one of more basic activities of daily living. To address the concern of functional loss in hospitalized elderly, clinical intervention trials have been conducted to test if specialized inpatient geriatric wards are effective in preventing decline. Results have been mixed with some studies showing improvement in functional decline while others have shown no benefits. Research on the role of nursing in preventing functional loss indicates that when nursing is more active at identifying functional concerns in older patients and initiate interventions elderly patients experience fewer declines in ADLs (Boyer et al, 1996; Hamilton et al, 1995; Swauger et al, 2002, Wanich et al, 1992). The literature on decline in ADLs of hospitalized elderly has not reported measurements of nurses' knowledge of functional decline or how nurses assess ADL status in elderly patients. Moreover, barriers that nurses experience to implementing clinical interventions when decline becomes evident is also not understood. If we can discover how nurses assess and intervene in care of older adults, specifically in the area of ADLs, focused intervention programs can be developed. These interventions will lead to improve patient outcomes. A pilot study was conducted using grounded theory methodology. This research method studies the relationships among how a phenomenon is understood, the actions related to those understandings and the consequences of those actions. In this case, this suggests an exploration of how 'care of older hospitalized patients' is understood; the actions nurses take in response to those understandings, and the consequences of those actions for both patient and nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Care of Older Adults in Acute Care Settings: Exploring Functional Declineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158961-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Care of Older Adults in Acute Care Settings: Exploring Functional Decline</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Barb, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UW-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Lake Mills, WI, 53551, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">randbking@charter.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">For many older adults, hospitalization can be a catastrophic event. Effects of illness on an already compromised system can precipitate serious decline and ultimately threaten an elder person's ability to live independently. Inouye, et al (1993) states that 34-50% of elderly patients experience functional decline during hospitalization. Similar percentages were also cited by Palmer, Counsell, and Landefeld (1998) who state that 25-35% of older adults who are admitted to a hospital for a medical illness lose independent function in one of more basic activities of daily living. To address the concern of functional loss in hospitalized elderly, clinical intervention trials have been conducted to test if specialized inpatient geriatric wards are effective in preventing decline. Results have been mixed with some studies showing improvement in functional decline while others have shown no benefits. Research on the role of nursing in preventing functional loss indicates that when nursing is more active at identifying functional concerns in older patients and initiate interventions elderly patients experience fewer declines in ADLs (Boyer et al, 1996; Hamilton et al, 1995; Swauger et al, 2002, Wanich et al, 1992). The literature on decline in ADLs of hospitalized elderly has not reported measurements of nurses' knowledge of functional decline or how nurses assess ADL status in elderly patients. Moreover, barriers that nurses experience to implementing clinical interventions when decline becomes evident is also not understood. If we can discover how nurses assess and intervene in care of older adults, specifically in the area of ADLs, focused intervention programs can be developed. These interventions will lead to improve patient outcomes. A pilot study was conducted using grounded theory methodology. This research method studies the relationships among how a phenomenon is understood, the actions related to those understandings and the consequences of those actions. In this case, this suggests an exploration of how 'care of older hospitalized patients' is understood; the actions nurses take in response to those understandings, and the consequences of those actions for both patient and nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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