2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158962
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Testing of a Middle-Range Theory of Hypertension Self-Care
Abstract:
Development and Testing of a Middle-Range Theory of Hypertension Self-Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Klymko, Kay, PhD; APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Physician HealthCare Network
Contact Address:, Port Huron, MI, 48060, USA
Co-Authors:N.T. Artinian and R.M. Peters, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; and N.T. Artinian, P.A. Lichtenberg, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Background: While there is evidence to support aging and hypertension's association with cognitive decline, few, if any, studies have related cognition, self-care, and blood pressure outcomes in African American elders. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to develop and test a middle range theory (MRT), Theory of Hypertension Self-Care (THSC), which was derived from Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficit. Method: A longitudinal and explanatory design was used to examine cognitive function at baseline and hypertension self-care behaviors and BP at 3-months follow-up in 102 hypertensive African American elders who were recruited from a clinical trial. Measures included the body mass index, Comorbidity Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, ENRICHD Social Support Instrument, Fuld Object Memory Evaluation, MacNeill Lichtenberg Decision Tree, 3-day dietary recalls, 7-day physical activity recalls, and an automated digital BP monitor (Omron HEM-737 Intellisense). Correlational and multiple linear regression statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: The sample demonstrated difficulties in memory, temporal orientation, and semantic fluency cognitive abilities with 50 (49%) participants scoring below the mean normative age cut off scores on one to six cognitive tests. Participants' cognitive abilities were affected by the basic conditioning factors of aging and aspects of health state (i.e., body mass and depression). Cognitive abilities were insufficient to uniquely or in combination with selected conditioning factors explain hypertension self-care. Combined conditioning factors, clinical trial group membership, and hypertension self-care predictors significantly accounted for a moderate proportion of systolic (20.5%) and diastolic (23.7%) BP variance. Discussion: The findings supported the usefulness of MRT development in elucidating the complexities of factors to successful hypertension self-care and BP outcomes. Significant relationships between conditioning factors, self-care agency, self-care, and health outcome suggest that age, health state, sociocultural factors, and cognitive ability are important considerations when developing helping methods for elder African Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Testing of a Middle-Range Theory of Hypertension Self-Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158962-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Testing of a Middle-Range Theory of Hypertension Self-Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Klymko, Kay, PhD; APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Physician HealthCare Network</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Port Huron, MI, 48060, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kklymko@advnet.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.T. Artinian and R.M. Peters, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; and N.T. Artinian, P.A. Lichtenberg, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: While there is evidence to support aging and hypertension's association with cognitive decline, few, if any, studies have related cognition, self-care, and blood pressure outcomes in African American elders. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to develop and test a middle range theory (MRT), Theory of Hypertension Self-Care (THSC), which was derived from Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficit. Method: A longitudinal and explanatory design was used to examine cognitive function at baseline and hypertension self-care behaviors and BP at 3-months follow-up in 102 hypertensive African American elders who were recruited from a clinical trial. Measures included the body mass index, Comorbidity Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, ENRICHD Social Support Instrument, Fuld Object Memory Evaluation, MacNeill Lichtenberg Decision Tree, 3-day dietary recalls, 7-day physical activity recalls, and an automated digital BP monitor (Omron HEM-737 Intellisense). Correlational and multiple linear regression statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: The sample demonstrated difficulties in memory, temporal orientation, and semantic fluency cognitive abilities with 50 (49%) participants scoring below the mean normative age cut off scores on one to six cognitive tests. Participants' cognitive abilities were affected by the basic conditioning factors of aging and aspects of health state (i.e., body mass and depression). Cognitive abilities were insufficient to uniquely or in combination with selected conditioning factors explain hypertension self-care. Combined conditioning factors, clinical trial group membership, and hypertension self-care predictors significantly accounted for a moderate proportion of systolic (20.5%) and diastolic (23.7%) BP variance. Discussion: The findings supported the usefulness of MRT development in elucidating the complexities of factors to successful hypertension self-care and BP outcomes. Significant relationships between conditioning factors, self-care agency, self-care, and health outcome suggest that age, health state, sociocultural factors, and cognitive ability are important considerations when developing helping methods for elder African Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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