The Use of Nonpharmacologic Comfort Measures During Labor in Primiparous Women Receiving Epidural Anesthesia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158963
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Nonpharmacologic Comfort Measures During Labor in Primiparous Women Receiving Epidural Anesthesia
Abstract:
The Use of Nonpharmacologic Comfort Measures During Labor in Primiparous Women Receiving Epidural Anesthesia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kocur, Kimberly, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Xavier
Contact Address:Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Co-Authors:C.A. Pepa, Nursing, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN
Laboring women utilize many comfort measures to cope with the labor process. The use of epidural anesthesia is growing in prevalence, with approximately 60% of laboring women in the United States choosing this option (Eltzschig, Lieberman & Camann, 2003). In urban areas epidural use may be considerably higher. Many laboring women continue to practice traditional nonpharmacologic comfort measures before epidural anesthesia is initiated, and during regional medication administration. Traditional childbirth education curricula include training in nonpharmacologic methods of pain relief and coping, as well as information on pharmacologic options. However, it is not known which nonpharmacologic methods women are using and how useful they perceive these interventions to be. The purpose of this ex post facto, descriptive study is to examine the use of nonpharmacologic methods of comfort in women who received epidural anesthesia. Kolcaba's theory of holistic comfort provides the framework for this study of primiparous women who gave birth in a large, suburban and a large urban teaching hospital. The convenience sample includes women who have given birth to their first child, received epidural anesthesia, and experienced labor. Data were collected at the two sites using a researcher developed questionnaire. A total of 53 women completed the questionnaire. Slow deep breathing was the most frequently used comfort measure in 82.4% of women. Position change was utilized in 49% and touch/massage in 35.3% of women. It is apparent that nonpharmacologic comfort measures are utilized by primiparous laboring women even when receiving epidural anesthesia. The results of this study will provide information to develop appropriate childbirth education curriculum regarding the use of nonpharmacologic comfort measures during labor. It will also provide information to assist nurses to provide holistic care during the birthing experience of laboring primiparous women. References: Eltzschig H.K., Lieberman E.S.& Camann W.R.(2003) Medical progress: Regional anesthesia and analgesia for labor and delivery. New England Journal of Medicine, 348(4), 319-32, 375-6.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Nonpharmacologic Comfort Measures During Labor in Primiparous Women Receiving Epidural Anesthesiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158963-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Nonpharmacologic Comfort Measures During Labor in Primiparous Women Receiving Epidural Anesthesia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kocur, Kimberly, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Xavier</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kocur@sxu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.A. Pepa, Nursing, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Laboring women utilize many comfort measures to cope with the labor process. The use of epidural anesthesia is growing in prevalence, with approximately 60% of laboring women in the United States choosing this option (Eltzschig, Lieberman &amp; Camann, 2003). In urban areas epidural use may be considerably higher. Many laboring women continue to practice traditional nonpharmacologic comfort measures before epidural anesthesia is initiated, and during regional medication administration. Traditional childbirth education curricula include training in nonpharmacologic methods of pain relief and coping, as well as information on pharmacologic options. However, it is not known which nonpharmacologic methods women are using and how useful they perceive these interventions to be. The purpose of this ex post facto, descriptive study is to examine the use of nonpharmacologic methods of comfort in women who received epidural anesthesia. Kolcaba's theory of holistic comfort provides the framework for this study of primiparous women who gave birth in a large, suburban and a large urban teaching hospital. The convenience sample includes women who have given birth to their first child, received epidural anesthesia, and experienced labor. Data were collected at the two sites using a researcher developed questionnaire. A total of 53 women completed the questionnaire. Slow deep breathing was the most frequently used comfort measure in 82.4% of women. Position change was utilized in 49% and touch/massage in 35.3% of women. It is apparent that nonpharmacologic comfort measures are utilized by primiparous laboring women even when receiving epidural anesthesia. The results of this study will provide information to develop appropriate childbirth education curriculum regarding the use of nonpharmacologic comfort measures during labor. It will also provide information to assist nurses to provide holistic care during the birthing experience of laboring primiparous women. References: Eltzschig H.K., Lieberman E.S.&amp; Camann W.R.(2003) Medical progress: Regional anesthesia and analgesia for labor and delivery. New England Journal of Medicine, 348(4), 319-32, 375-6.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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