Exploring the Life of Young, Black Women With HIV: The Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158965
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Life of Young, Black Women With HIV: The Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Age
Abstract:
Exploring the Life of Young, Black Women With HIV: The Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Age
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lambert, Joette, PhDc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Contact Address:, Detroit, MI, 48221, USA
Co-Authors:K. Aroian, Wayne State University , Detroit, MI
Purpose Very little is known about young women with HIV in the United States. Half of all new HIV infections are among people under age 25; young women are especially at risk. According to the CDC, among teens ages 13-19, 64% of HIV cases are in females; 66% of all 13-19 year olds with HIV are Black; and through 1999, Blacks and Hispanics accounted for 77% of all AIDS diagnoses in women. Conceptual framework The framework of intersectionality is being used to guide this phenomenological exploration of HIV positive young Black women. Subjects/methods. Face to face interviews have been conducted with18 young Black women seen in a Ryan White Care Act-funded clinic for HIV positive youth in an urban setting. Young men seen in that clinic, staff and observational data will provide context and contrast. Analysis Data analysis is concurrent with data collection. InVivo software is being used to group emerging concepts and themes. Analysis is ongoing. Results Early findings suggest that for young women who are engaged in meaningful activity, HIV serves as a character-building phenomenon. Young women with college plans, who are married, or who are parenting, refer to HIV as "the best thing that ever happened to me.". In contrast, young women who are childless, disconnected, and have few future goals, refer to their lives being over because of HIV; living a "shadow life"; and "just waiting to die." Conclusions HIV is now called "the fifty year disease." Health care workers must assist HIV positive young women to achieve their life goals and to become contributing members of society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Life of Young, Black Women With HIV: The Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Ageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158965-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring the Life of Young, Black Women With HIV: The Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Age</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lambert, Joette, PhDc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Detroit, MI, 48221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lamberjm@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Aroian, Wayne State University , Detroit, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose Very little is known about young women with HIV in the United States. Half of all new HIV infections are among people under age 25; young women are especially at risk. According to the CDC, among teens ages 13-19, 64% of HIV cases are in females; 66% of all 13-19 year olds with HIV are Black; and through 1999, Blacks and Hispanics accounted for 77% of all AIDS diagnoses in women. Conceptual framework The framework of intersectionality is being used to guide this phenomenological exploration of HIV positive young Black women. Subjects/methods. Face to face interviews have been conducted with18 young Black women seen in a Ryan White Care Act-funded clinic for HIV positive youth in an urban setting. Young men seen in that clinic, staff and observational data will provide context and contrast. Analysis Data analysis is concurrent with data collection. InVivo software is being used to group emerging concepts and themes. Analysis is ongoing. Results Early findings suggest that for young women who are engaged in meaningful activity, HIV serves as a character-building phenomenon. Young women with college plans, who are married, or who are parenting, refer to HIV as &quot;the best thing that ever happened to me.&quot;. In contrast, young women who are childless, disconnected, and have few future goals, refer to their lives being over because of HIV; living a &quot;shadow life&quot;; and &quot;just waiting to die.&quot; Conclusions HIV is now called &quot;the fifty year disease.&quot; Health care workers must assist HIV positive young women to achieve their life goals and to become contributing members of society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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