Symptom Experience for Males and Females Before and Up to 6 Months After Lung Transplant (LT)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158966
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Experience for Males and Females Before and Up to 6 Months After Lung Transplant (LT)
Abstract:
Symptom Experience for Males and Females Before and Up to 6 Months After Lung Transplant (LT)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lefaiver, Cheryl, Ph.D, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Advocate Christ Medical Center
Contact Address:North Office Build-suite 108N, Oak Lawn, IL, 60453, USA
Co-Authors:D.M. Lanuza, R. Brown, and R. Love, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI and S. Bhorade, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
To assist patients in managing their symptoms, it is important to know what they are. Yet, little is known about symptoms before and after LT or whether gender differences exist. The purpose of this study was to describe symptoms in males and females before and up to 6 months after LT. The Roy Adaptation Model guided this study. The sample consisted of 163 LT patients; 96 females (77% white; the majority [34.7%] diagnosed with COPD) and 67 males (82.1% white; the majority [38.8%] diagnosed with Pulmonary Fibrosis). Candidates completed the transplant symptom inventory (TSI) before and at 1, 3, and 6 months after LT. The TSI is a 67-item, two-part instrument measuring symptom frequency and distress (Cronbach alpha = 0.94). Data were analyzed with RIDIT analysis and Mantell-Hanzel chi-square. Before LT, both males and females ranked shortness of breath (SOB) with activity as occurring most frequently and causing the most distress. Six months after LT, both genders reported a significant (p<0.01) decrease in the frequency of SOB with activity, in the frequency and distress for SOB at rest, and a decrease in the frequency of fatigue, chest tightness, and feeling lack of control. Females also reported a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the frequency of heart palpitations, tiring easily and feeling helpless. In contrast, males not only reported a significant (p<0.05) decrease in frequency but also in the distress associated with SOB with activity, tiring easily, feeling afraid and feeling sad. Furthermore, males reported a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the frequency of sleepiness, fever, feeling depressed, feeling helpless and irritability. Negative symptoms reported by females included a significant (p<0.01) increase in the frequency of tremors. Conversely, negative symptoms reported by males included a significant (p<0.05) increase in the frequency and distress of nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and tremors. By 6 months after LT, both genders had significantly less SOB, fatigue symptoms and feelings of helplessness. Male recipients reported more positive improvements and more negative symptoms than females. These findings underscore the importance of assessing for the presence of LT symptoms, in addition to SOB, and to realize that gender differences exist.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Experience for Males and Females Before and Up to 6 Months After Lung Transplant (LT)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158966-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Experience for Males and Females Before and Up to 6 Months After Lung Transplant (LT)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lefaiver, Cheryl, Ph.D, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Advocate Christ Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">North Office Build-suite 108N, Oak Lawn, IL, 60453, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cheryl.lefaiver@advocatehealth.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.M. Lanuza, R. Brown, and R. Love, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI and S. Bhorade, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To assist patients in managing their symptoms, it is important to know what they are. Yet, little is known about symptoms before and after LT or whether gender differences exist. The purpose of this study was to describe symptoms in males and females before and up to 6 months after LT. The Roy Adaptation Model guided this study. The sample consisted of 163 LT patients; 96 females (77% white; the majority [34.7%] diagnosed with COPD) and 67 males (82.1% white; the majority [38.8%] diagnosed with Pulmonary Fibrosis). Candidates completed the transplant symptom inventory (TSI) before and at 1, 3, and 6 months after LT. The TSI is a 67-item, two-part instrument measuring symptom frequency and distress (Cronbach alpha = 0.94). Data were analyzed with RIDIT analysis and Mantell-Hanzel chi-square. Before LT, both males and females ranked shortness of breath (SOB) with activity as occurring most frequently and causing the most distress. Six months after LT, both genders reported a significant (p&lt;0.01) decrease in the frequency of SOB with activity, in the frequency and distress for SOB at rest, and a decrease in the frequency of fatigue, chest tightness, and feeling lack of control. Females also reported a significant (p&lt;0.05) decrease in the frequency of heart palpitations, tiring easily and feeling helpless. In contrast, males not only reported a significant (p&lt;0.05) decrease in frequency but also in the distress associated with SOB with activity, tiring easily, feeling afraid and feeling sad. Furthermore, males reported a significant (p&lt;0.05) decrease in the frequency of sleepiness, fever, feeling depressed, feeling helpless and irritability. Negative symptoms reported by females included a significant (p&lt;0.01) increase in the frequency of tremors. Conversely, negative symptoms reported by males included a significant (p&lt;0.05) increase in the frequency and distress of nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and tremors. By 6 months after LT, both genders had significantly less SOB, fatigue symptoms and feelings of helplessness. Male recipients reported more positive improvements and more negative symptoms than females. These findings underscore the importance of assessing for the presence of LT symptoms, in addition to SOB, and to realize that gender differences exist.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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