Causal Attributions of Individuals With Suspected Lung Cancer: Before and Following Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Causal Attributions of Individuals With Suspected Lung Cancer: Before and Following Surgery
Abstract:
Causal Attributions of Individuals With Suspected Lung Cancer: Before and Following Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lehto, Rebecca, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
The aim of the study was to examine causal attributions among individuals newly diagnosed with suspected lung cancer, and to determine relationships between causal attributions and emotional adjustment before and after surgery. Causal attribution theory articulates the human need to understand, give meaning to, and ascribe causation to unexpected and unfortunate illness events. Lung cancer, an illness associated with cigarette smoking, may lead to emotional distress among individuals who blame themselves and personal behaviors for the illness. Of the 42 participants, ages 37-83 years, 39 (93%) had a history of smoking and 10 (24%) were current smokers. Attributions were measured by the 17-item cause component of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) which tests degree of concurrence. In addition, participants added personal most important causes. Emotional distress was measured by the 6-item emotional representation component of the IPQ-R and included perceptions of anger, depression, worry, being upset, and anxiety related to the illness. Statistical methods included descriptives, frequencies, correlations, and content analyses. Before surgery, smoking (69%), environmental pollutants (48%), personal behaviors (40%), and aging (31%) were the most frequently cited causes. Following surgery, smoking (69%), personal behaviors (48%), aging (33%), chance/bad luck (33%), and pollution (33%) were cited most. Smoking was listed by 45% and 50% of the sample at both time points as the most important illness cause followed by environmental toxins, e.g., agent orange, asbestos, chemicals. Causal attributions, including internal, e.g., smoking behaviors, and external, e.g., environmental pollutants, were not related to emotional distress at either time point. While individuals with lung cancer attribute personal causes to their illness, this was not associated with increased emotional distress scores in general. Participants ascribed other less controllable illness causes in addition to smoking that may have offset emotional distress. Findings can be used to enhance nurses understanding of how individuals cognitively place an unexpected diagnosis of lung cancer into an adaptive causal framework. Supported by NINR, 1 F31 NR07695-01A1; T32 NR0704.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCausal Attributions of Individuals With Suspected Lung Cancer: Before and Following Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Causal Attributions of Individuals With Suspected Lung Cancer: Before and Following Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lehto, Rebecca, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rhlehto@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The aim of the study was to examine causal attributions among individuals newly diagnosed with suspected lung cancer, and to determine relationships between causal attributions and emotional adjustment before and after surgery. Causal attribution theory articulates the human need to understand, give meaning to, and ascribe causation to unexpected and unfortunate illness events. Lung cancer, an illness associated with cigarette smoking, may lead to emotional distress among individuals who blame themselves and personal behaviors for the illness. Of the 42 participants, ages 37-83 years, 39 (93%) had a history of smoking and 10 (24%) were current smokers. Attributions were measured by the 17-item cause component of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) which tests degree of concurrence. In addition, participants added personal most important causes. Emotional distress was measured by the 6-item emotional representation component of the IPQ-R and included perceptions of anger, depression, worry, being upset, and anxiety related to the illness. Statistical methods included descriptives, frequencies, correlations, and content analyses. Before surgery, smoking (69%), environmental pollutants (48%), personal behaviors (40%), and aging (31%) were the most frequently cited causes. Following surgery, smoking (69%), personal behaviors (48%), aging (33%), chance/bad luck (33%), and pollution (33%) were cited most. Smoking was listed by 45% and 50% of the sample at both time points as the most important illness cause followed by environmental toxins, e.g., agent orange, asbestos, chemicals. Causal attributions, including internal, e.g., smoking behaviors, and external, e.g., environmental pollutants, were not related to emotional distress at either time point. While individuals with lung cancer attribute personal causes to their illness, this was not associated with increased emotional distress scores in general. Participants ascribed other less controllable illness causes in addition to smoking that may have offset emotional distress. Findings can be used to enhance nurses understanding of how individuals cognitively place an unexpected diagnosis of lung cancer into an adaptive causal framework. Supported by NINR, 1 F31 NR07695-01A1; T32 NR0704.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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