2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158968
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Being Sure: Women's Decision-Making with an Inevitable Miscarriage
Abstract:
Being Sure: Women's Decision-Making with an Inevitable Miscarriage
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Limbo, Rana, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation
Contact Address:Bereavement and Advance Care Planning Services, La Crosse, WI, 54601, USA
Co-Authors:J. Glasser, B. Mayer, and K. Maas, Bereavement and Advance Care Planning Services, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation, La Crosse, WI; and C. Schauberger, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, La Crosse, WI
Purpose: To describe issues and clinician support in women's decision-making related to inevitable miscarriage Design: Qualitative, exploratory Participants: Convenience sample of 16 women who miscarried in the first trimester of pregnancy, 2 to 4 weeks prior to the interview; could speak English; were at least 18 years old; and had to make a treatment decision. Recruited from an outpatient obstetrics and gynecology department. Methods: Audiotaped, semi-structured interview by telephone, lasting 45 minutes to 1 hour. Themes derived from qualitative description method. Results: Themes include 1. Being Sure that the pregnancy was not viable, 2. Making Multiple Decisions (not limited to only a decision about treatment), 3. Relating (to health care clinicians), and 4. Feeling sad. All women in the study perceived a loss, with 15 identifying the loss as a 'baby.' Conclusion: Women needed to be sure that the pregnancy was not viable prior to making a treatment decision. Most chose surgical management (dilation and curettage). Other decisions included such things as who to bring with them, how to tell others, and when to come in. Relating to physicians, nurse midwives, clinic nurses, and telephone nurse advisors assisted in the decision making. Women need supplies and written information on how to manage a miscarriage at home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeing Sure: Women's Decision-Making with an Inevitable Miscarriageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158968-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Being Sure: Women's Decision-Making with an Inevitable Miscarriage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Limbo, Rana, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Bereavement and Advance Care Planning Services, La Crosse, WI, 54601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rklimbo@gundluth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Glasser, B. Mayer, and K. Maas, Bereavement and Advance Care Planning Services, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation, La Crosse, WI; and C. Schauberger, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, La Crosse, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe issues and clinician support in women's decision-making related to inevitable miscarriage Design: Qualitative, exploratory Participants: Convenience sample of 16 women who miscarried in the first trimester of pregnancy, 2 to 4 weeks prior to the interview; could speak English; were at least 18 years old; and had to make a treatment decision. Recruited from an outpatient obstetrics and gynecology department. Methods: Audiotaped, semi-structured interview by telephone, lasting 45 minutes to 1 hour. Themes derived from qualitative description method. Results: Themes include 1. Being Sure that the pregnancy was not viable, 2. Making Multiple Decisions (not limited to only a decision about treatment), 3. Relating (to health care clinicians), and 4. Feeling sad. All women in the study perceived a loss, with 15 identifying the loss as a 'baby.' Conclusion: Women needed to be sure that the pregnancy was not viable prior to making a treatment decision. Most chose surgical management (dilation and curettage). Other decisions included such things as who to bring with them, how to tell others, and when to come in. Relating to physicians, nurse midwives, clinic nurses, and telephone nurse advisors assisted in the decision making. Women need supplies and written information on how to manage a miscarriage at home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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