2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158970
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Goodnight to Nightingale: Radiation Therapy and the Dawn of Modern Nursing
Abstract:
Goodnight to Nightingale: Radiation Therapy and the Dawn of Modern Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lusk, Brigid, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Contact Address:Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Recognition of the effectiveness of radiation against cancerous growths, shortly after its discovery in the late 1890s, ushered in a new era of cancer therapeutics. Specialized nursing care was essential for patients undergoing radiation treatment, whether via the bulky new machines or expensive radium applications. This specialized nursing care and radiation equipment mandated treatment in hospitals. Previously, only the indigent were subjected to hospital care; even surgery was performed in patients' homes. This historical study of nurses' involvement with early radiation therapies adds a new perspective to the early twentieth century relocation of patient care, from home to hospital. This study also describes the technical nursing care required for these patients, which evolved into cancer nursing as a specialty. Primary sources included school of nursing and hospital annual reports, nursing procedure books, nurses' personal papers, and contemporary scholarly literature. This study was supported by the Rockefeller Archives Center, The Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry at the University of Virginia, and the Oncology Nurses Society. Student nurses around 1900 studied the history of x-rays and radium, along with some indication of radiation's physics and radium's extreme rarity and expense. Nurses' key role in x-ray therapy was tending to the patients' inevitable radiation burns and sickness. For patients with radium implants, nurses ensured that the applicators didn't slip into healthy tissue or, just as serious, get accidentally discarded. Nurses checked radium placement every few minutes, encouraged fluids to dilute toxins, and irrigated wounds to flush out dead tissue. Nurses were taught to give emergency care for such catastrophic events as erosion of irradiated vessels or laryngeal blockage. Meanwhile, there was no documented concern for nurses' safety until the 1920s and nurses were routinely exposed to radiation, sometimes with disastrous consequences. In conclusion, patients undergoing radiation therapy for cancer required technical, hospital-based nursing care. Nurses administering this level of care assumed a new and more critical role in patients' illness experience, and signaled the emergence of a specialized branch of cancer nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGoodnight to Nightingale: Radiation Therapy and the Dawn of Modern Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158970-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Goodnight to Nightingale: Radiation Therapy and the Dawn of Modern Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lusk, Brigid, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blusk@niu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recognition of the effectiveness of radiation against cancerous growths, shortly after its discovery in the late 1890s, ushered in a new era of cancer therapeutics. Specialized nursing care was essential for patients undergoing radiation treatment, whether via the bulky new machines or expensive radium applications. This specialized nursing care and radiation equipment mandated treatment in hospitals. Previously, only the indigent were subjected to hospital care; even surgery was performed in patients' homes. This historical study of nurses' involvement with early radiation therapies adds a new perspective to the early twentieth century relocation of patient care, from home to hospital. This study also describes the technical nursing care required for these patients, which evolved into cancer nursing as a specialty. Primary sources included school of nursing and hospital annual reports, nursing procedure books, nurses' personal papers, and contemporary scholarly literature. This study was supported by the Rockefeller Archives Center, The Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry at the University of Virginia, and the Oncology Nurses Society. Student nurses around 1900 studied the history of x-rays and radium, along with some indication of radiation's physics and radium's extreme rarity and expense. Nurses' key role in x-ray therapy was tending to the patients' inevitable radiation burns and sickness. For patients with radium implants, nurses ensured that the applicators didn't slip into healthy tissue or, just as serious, get accidentally discarded. Nurses checked radium placement every few minutes, encouraged fluids to dilute toxins, and irrigated wounds to flush out dead tissue. Nurses were taught to give emergency care for such catastrophic events as erosion of irradiated vessels or laryngeal blockage. Meanwhile, there was no documented concern for nurses' safety until the 1920s and nurses were routinely exposed to radiation, sometimes with disastrous consequences. In conclusion, patients undergoing radiation therapy for cancer required technical, hospital-based nursing care. Nurses administering this level of care assumed a new and more critical role in patients' illness experience, and signaled the emergence of a specialized branch of cancer nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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