Symptom Response of Overactive Bladder to Reduction in Intake of 'Irritating' Beverages

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158974
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Response of Overactive Bladder to Reduction in Intake of 'Irritating' Beverages
Abstract:
Symptom Response of Overactive Bladder to Reduction in Intake of 'Irritating' Beverages
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Miller, Janis, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:, 400 N Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Aim: Symptoms of overactive bladder (frequency and urgency) are prevalent and costly. Women with the condition are commonly advised to reduce potentially "irritating" beverages: coffee, tea, chocolate, colas, alcohol, acidic fruit juices and fluids with artificial sweetener. However evidence is lacking to document the effect of these "irritating" beverages on the bladder and the underlying mechanisms involved. In this study we used a modified cross-over design to test if symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) are reduced when women are asked to decrease volume of "irritating" beverages. Methods: 31 women with OAB and a history of at least 16 oz per day of "irritating" beverages were asked to keep a 3-day intake-output diary under conditions of normal habits (Trial 1), no "irritating" beverages (Trial 2), and half the baseline volume of "irritating" beverages (Trial 3). Women were also requested to maintain a steady total volume of fluid intake by substituting water or milk for the "irritating" beverages. Symptom questionnaires at each time point included: A) "Over the past 3 days, when you urinated, what was your usual perception of your bladder fullness?" (Ranging from 0 "no bladder sensation," to 4 "immediate urinating was mandatory and/or fear of leakage.") (De watcher, 2003); B) "Typically, when you needed to go to the bathroom today you could--?" (Ranging from 1 "make the urge go away" to 5 "feel the urine already coming out.") (Bower, 2001); and C) Bother Questionnaire with possible raw score range of 40 (Coyne, 2002). Results: There was a significant decrease in OAB symptom scores from Trial 1 to Trial 2, and from Trial 1 to Trial 3 (see table). There was also a significant decrease in total output volume. When analyzed by women who did and did not drink caffeinated beverages at baseline, results did not differ. Further investigation is underway to determine relative contribution of other specific ingredients, such as artificial sweetener, and to test effect in a RCT. Conclusion: OAB symptoms lessen in response to decrease in intake of beverages traditionally classified as "irritating" to the bladder. Specificity of the underlying ingredient/s responsible, and the mechanism/s involved are unknown. Acknowledgements: NIH P30 NR009000-01.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Response of Overactive Bladder to Reduction in Intake of 'Irritating' Beveragesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158974-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Response of Overactive Bladder to Reduction in Intake of 'Irritating' Beverages</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Janis, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 400 N Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janismm@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: Symptoms of overactive bladder (frequency and urgency) are prevalent and costly. Women with the condition are commonly advised to reduce potentially &quot;irritating&quot; beverages: coffee, tea, chocolate, colas, alcohol, acidic fruit juices and fluids with artificial sweetener. However evidence is lacking to document the effect of these &quot;irritating&quot; beverages on the bladder and the underlying mechanisms involved. In this study we used a modified cross-over design to test if symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) are reduced when women are asked to decrease volume of &quot;irritating&quot; beverages. Methods: 31 women with OAB and a history of at least 16 oz per day of &quot;irritating&quot; beverages were asked to keep a 3-day intake-output diary under conditions of normal habits (Trial 1), no &quot;irritating&quot; beverages (Trial 2), and half the baseline volume of &quot;irritating&quot; beverages (Trial 3). Women were also requested to maintain a steady total volume of fluid intake by substituting water or milk for the &quot;irritating&quot; beverages. Symptom questionnaires at each time point included: A) &quot;Over the past 3 days, when you urinated, what was your usual perception of your bladder fullness?&quot; (Ranging from 0 &quot;no bladder sensation,&quot; to 4 &quot;immediate urinating was mandatory and/or fear of leakage.&quot;) (De watcher, 2003); B) &quot;Typically, when you needed to go to the bathroom today you could--?&quot; (Ranging from 1 &quot;make the urge go away&quot; to 5 &quot;feel the urine already coming out.&quot;) (Bower, 2001); and C) Bother Questionnaire with possible raw score range of 40 (Coyne, 2002). Results: There was a significant decrease in OAB symptom scores from Trial 1 to Trial 2, and from Trial 1 to Trial 3 (see table). There was also a significant decrease in total output volume. When analyzed by women who did and did not drink caffeinated beverages at baseline, results did not differ. Further investigation is underway to determine relative contribution of other specific ingredients, such as artificial sweetener, and to test effect in a RCT. Conclusion: OAB symptoms lessen in response to decrease in intake of beverages traditionally classified as &quot;irritating&quot; to the bladder. Specificity of the underlying ingredient/s responsible, and the mechanism/s involved are unknown. Acknowledgements: NIH P30 NR009000-01.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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