Differences Between Online and Onsite Options for Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences Between Online and Onsite Options for Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Programs
Abstract:
Differences Between Online and Onsite Options for Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Programs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mills, Andrew, Ph.D., M.S.N.
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO, 63104-1099, USA
The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which differences exist between graduate nursing students (master's and post-master's) who complete Web-based, distance learning courses and those who completes on-site courses. A framework for evaluation of distance learning from the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research guided the investigation (i.e., student outcomes, program effectiveness, and organizational effectiveness). Secondary data analysis was undertaken using 7 years of archival data. The study was approved by the university's Institutional Review Board. All nurse practitioner (NP) students admitted to the MSN degree and Post-MSN certificate programs for fall 1997 semester through fall 2003 semester were included in the study. A series of ANOVA, & chi 2, t-, or Fisher exact tests were used to compare variables at the appropriate level of data measurement and sample size. Distance learning NP students completing a master's degree were about 6 years older than similar on-site students, more likely to be married, and more likely to be living in a rural community. No differences existed as to their sex, ethnicity, admission grade point average, or probation status on admission. No statistical difference was found between distance learning and on-site master's students in their end-of-program cumulative grade point average and in the self-reported board certification rates for combined master's and post-master's students. Of the 17 courses analyzed, 12 courses demonstrated no differences in final course grades between on-site and on-line courses across the years. The yield rate for accepted master's degree students (enrollments compared to admissions) was lower for distance learning NP students. The on-line students took considerably longer to complete the master's degree program yet had a higher retention rate (i.e., lower student withdrawal rate). There were no tuition or fee structure differences for students on-site or on-line. Financial data, however, revealed that the distance learning options had higher costs than on-site options. It was not possible to measure all the suggested measures in the EDUCAUSE framework. Faculty-related outcomes would have provided a more complete evaluation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences Between Online and Onsite Options for Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158975-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences Between Online and Onsite Options for Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mills, Andrew, Ph.D., M.S.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, St. Louis, MO, 63104-1099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">millsac@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to determine the extent to which differences exist between graduate nursing students (master's and post-master's) who complete Web-based, distance learning courses and those who completes on-site courses. A framework for evaluation of distance learning from the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research guided the investigation (i.e., student outcomes, program effectiveness, and organizational effectiveness). Secondary data analysis was undertaken using 7 years of archival data. The study was approved by the university's Institutional Review Board. All nurse practitioner (NP) students admitted to the MSN degree and Post-MSN certificate programs for fall 1997 semester through fall 2003 semester were included in the study. A series of ANOVA, &amp; chi 2, t-, or Fisher exact tests were used to compare variables at the appropriate level of data measurement and sample size. Distance learning NP students completing a master's degree were about 6 years older than similar on-site students, more likely to be married, and more likely to be living in a rural community. No differences existed as to their sex, ethnicity, admission grade point average, or probation status on admission. No statistical difference was found between distance learning and on-site master's students in their end-of-program cumulative grade point average and in the self-reported board certification rates for combined master's and post-master's students. Of the 17 courses analyzed, 12 courses demonstrated no differences in final course grades between on-site and on-line courses across the years. The yield rate for accepted master's degree students (enrollments compared to admissions) was lower for distance learning NP students. The on-line students took considerably longer to complete the master's degree program yet had a higher retention rate (i.e., lower student withdrawal rate). There were no tuition or fee structure differences for students on-site or on-line. Financial data, however, revealed that the distance learning options had higher costs than on-site options. It was not possible to measure all the suggested measures in the EDUCAUSE framework. Faculty-related outcomes would have provided a more complete evaluation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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