Family Stress and Functioning in Caregivers to Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairments: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158976
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Stress and Functioning in Caregivers to Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairments: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Family Stress and Functioning in Caregivers to Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairments: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Musil, Carol
P.I. Institution Name:CWRU
Contact Address:Nursing School, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:A. Abdrbo, M. Lambrix, C. Warner, and K. Smyth, Nursing School, CWRU, Cleveland, OH
Over the past decade, the prevalence of elders identified with mild cognitive impairments (MCI) has increased. While much research has considered the stress and well-being of caregivers to elders with dementia, little is known about the stresses and functioning of families when a member is identified as having MCI. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationships between family stress, family functioning and caregiver resourcefulness, both cross-sectionally and over four months, in caregivers to those with MCI. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress was the theoretical framework used in this pilot study. Participants were recruited from eligible caregivers in a larger longitudinal study at a University-affiliated memory and aging research center. The MCI caregivers completed a mailed survey at two time points, four months apart. The survey incorporated the Family Inventory of Life Events, Rosenbaum's Self-Control Schedule, the Family Assessment Device, and a Visual Analog stress measure at Time 1 (n=42) and Time 2 (n=28). Results: Measures show adequate to good reliability. Cross-sectional results show significant correlations between intra-family conflict with greater problems in family communication, more difficult family life events, and greater stress at Time 1. Higher resourcefulness is associated with fewer problems in general family functioning. There are moderate to high correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 measures, except for negative life events and intra-family conflict. The mean values indicate that intra-family conflict and negative life events are significantly less in Time 2. In addition, participants, generally spouses, shared written comments at Time 2 about their experiences living with individuals having MCI; they noted general stability in the care recipient and efforts at maintaining activity and open communication. Intra-family conflict, family life events, resourcefulness, and family functioning appear to be useful constructs for understanding family dynamics in this population. Directions for future research will be considered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Stress and Functioning in Caregivers to Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairments: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158976-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Stress and Functioning in Caregivers to Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairments: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">CWRU</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing School, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.musil@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Abdrbo, M. Lambrix, C. Warner, and K. Smyth, Nursing School, CWRU, Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past decade, the prevalence of elders identified with mild cognitive impairments (MCI) has increased. While much research has considered the stress and well-being of caregivers to elders with dementia, little is known about the stresses and functioning of families when a member is identified as having MCI. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationships between family stress, family functioning and caregiver resourcefulness, both cross-sectionally and over four months, in caregivers to those with MCI. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress was the theoretical framework used in this pilot study. Participants were recruited from eligible caregivers in a larger longitudinal study at a University-affiliated memory and aging research center. The MCI caregivers completed a mailed survey at two time points, four months apart. The survey incorporated the Family Inventory of Life Events, Rosenbaum's Self-Control Schedule, the Family Assessment Device, and a Visual Analog stress measure at Time 1 (n=42) and Time 2 (n=28). Results: Measures show adequate to good reliability. Cross-sectional results show significant correlations between intra-family conflict with greater problems in family communication, more difficult family life events, and greater stress at Time 1. Higher resourcefulness is associated with fewer problems in general family functioning. There are moderate to high correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 measures, except for negative life events and intra-family conflict. The mean values indicate that intra-family conflict and negative life events are significantly less in Time 2. In addition, participants, generally spouses, shared written comments at Time 2 about their experiences living with individuals having MCI; they noted general stability in the care recipient and efforts at maintaining activity and open communication. Intra-family conflict, family life events, resourcefulness, and family functioning appear to be useful constructs for understanding family dynamics in this population. Directions for future research will be considered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:34:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:34:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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