Learning Together: Using Simulation to Develop Collaborative Educational Experiences between Nursing and Medical Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158979
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Together: Using Simulation to Develop Collaborative Educational Experiences between Nursing and Medical Students
Abstract:
Learning Together: Using Simulation to Develop Collaborative Educational Experiences between Nursing and Medical Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Reese, Cynthia, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Lincoln Land Community College
Contact Address:Nursing - PO Box 19256, Springfield, IL, 62794-9256, USA
Collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a core educational requirement cited by the IOM Health Professions Education Report(2003). This descriptive study supports the use of the Simulation Model as a framework to design simulations and describes the integration of an interdisciplinary teaching strategy into a health professions curriculum. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the Jeffries (2005) Simulation Model as a framework for the collaborative medical and nursing management of a surgical patient with complications. A convenience sample of fifteen third year medical students and thirteen senior (seventh semester) baccalaureate nursing students were recruited for the study. Evaluation of the simulation design features, student satisfaction and self- confidence following simulation were measured using the 20-item Simulation Design Scale, the 14-item Self-Confidence and Satisfaction Scale, and the researcher-developed 12-item Collaboration Scale. Measures were scored on a 5 point Likert-type scale. Three open ended questions were included in the Collaboration Scale and were analyzed using qualitative methods. Results indicate both medical and nursing student groups' perceptions of the design features of the collaborative simulation were positive. While no significant differences (p > .05) were found between the nursing and medical student groups, feedback and guided reflection were identified by students as important simulation design features. Students reported satisfaction with the medical and nursing collaborative aspects of the simulation. All reported increased self-confidence in their ability to care for post operative patients with complications in the future. Data analyzed from the Collaboration Scale suggest designing teaching learning simulations that place medical and nursing students together is beneficial for both the medical students and the nursing students and is a means to meet the IOM recommendations about building interdisciplinary relationships in health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Together: Using Simulation to Develop Collaborative Educational Experiences between Nursing and Medical Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158979-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning Together: Using Simulation to Develop Collaborative Educational Experiences between Nursing and Medical Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reese, Cynthia, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lincoln Land Community College</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing - PO Box 19256, Springfield, IL, 62794-9256, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cynthia.reese@llcc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a core educational requirement cited by the IOM Health Professions Education Report(2003). This descriptive study supports the use of the Simulation Model as a framework to design simulations and describes the integration of an interdisciplinary teaching strategy into a health professions curriculum. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the Jeffries (2005) Simulation Model as a framework for the collaborative medical and nursing management of a surgical patient with complications. A convenience sample of fifteen third year medical students and thirteen senior (seventh semester) baccalaureate nursing students were recruited for the study. Evaluation of the simulation design features, student satisfaction and self- confidence following simulation were measured using the 20-item Simulation Design Scale, the 14-item Self-Confidence and Satisfaction Scale, and the researcher-developed 12-item Collaboration Scale. Measures were scored on a 5 point Likert-type scale. Three open ended questions were included in the Collaboration Scale and were analyzed using qualitative methods. Results indicate both medical and nursing student groups' perceptions of the design features of the collaborative simulation were positive. While no significant differences (p &gt; .05) were found between the nursing and medical student groups, feedback and guided reflection were identified by students as important simulation design features. Students reported satisfaction with the medical and nursing collaborative aspects of the simulation. All reported increased self-confidence in their ability to care for post operative patients with complications in the future. Data analyzed from the Collaboration Scale suggest designing teaching learning simulations that place medical and nursing students together is beneficial for both the medical students and the nursing students and is a means to meet the IOM recommendations about building interdisciplinary relationships in health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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