Relationships Among Shared Care, Self-Care, and Health Status for Both a Person With Heart Failure and Their Family Caregiver

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158985
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationships Among Shared Care, Self-Care, and Health Status for Both a Person With Heart Failure and Their Family Caregiver
Abstract:
Relationships Among Shared Care, Self-Care, and Health Status for Both a Person With Heart Failure and Their Family Caregiver
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sebern, Margaret, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Family support is proposed to influence self-care in persons with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family support, self-care in heart failure, and the health status of both patients and caregivers. The theoretical basis on this study was a construct called shared care and the social support framework. Shared care was identified in previous work to describe a family care interaction with three components, communication, decision-making, and reciprocity. A naturalistic decision-making framework, which addressed how people make decisions in real-world settings, was use to operationalize and measure self care in heart failure. A convenience sample of 94 adult heart failure patients attending an outpatient cardiology clinic, and 84 adult family caregivers participated in this study. A cross-sectional design was used. Survey packages were offered to 200 patients during their schedule cardiology clinic visit. Each survey package included the Shared care instrument (SCI-3), Self care in heart failure index (SCHFI), demographic and a health status measure, written instructions, and a stamped return envelope. The SPSS subprograms frequencies, factor and reliability were used to compute demographic analysis and instrument psychometrics. Correlations and paired t-test were used to examine the relationships among components of shared care, self-care, and the health status of both patients and caregivers. The findings supported the relationships between shared care components, self care, and health status. For example, patient self-maintenance correlated with patient shared care decision-making (r = 0.35 p = 0.001), and caregiver shared care decision-making (r = 0.25 p = 0.02). Patient shared care communication correlated with caregiver health status (r = .30, p = .01), and patient health status (r = 0.24 p = 0.02). Caregivers perceived significantly less communication then the patient (t = -2.1, p = .03). Implications for nursing are; nurses can assess shared care components in family dyads, design interventions targeting areas of difficulty, and evaluate the effects of shared care interventions on the patient's decision making ability and self-confidence, and both members health status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationships Among Shared Care, Self-Care, and Health Status for Both a Person With Heart Failure and Their Family Caregiveren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158985-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationships Among Shared Care, Self-Care, and Health Status for Both a Person With Heart Failure and Their Family Caregiver</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sebern, Margaret, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marge@sebern.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family support is proposed to influence self-care in persons with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family support, self-care in heart failure, and the health status of both patients and caregivers. The theoretical basis on this study was a construct called shared care and the social support framework. Shared care was identified in previous work to describe a family care interaction with three components, communication, decision-making, and reciprocity. A naturalistic decision-making framework, which addressed how people make decisions in real-world settings, was use to operationalize and measure self care in heart failure. A convenience sample of 94 adult heart failure patients attending an outpatient cardiology clinic, and 84 adult family caregivers participated in this study. A cross-sectional design was used. Survey packages were offered to 200 patients during their schedule cardiology clinic visit. Each survey package included the Shared care instrument (SCI-3), Self care in heart failure index (SCHFI), demographic and a health status measure, written instructions, and a stamped return envelope. The SPSS subprograms frequencies, factor and reliability were used to compute demographic analysis and instrument psychometrics. Correlations and paired t-test were used to examine the relationships among components of shared care, self-care, and the health status of both patients and caregivers. The findings supported the relationships between shared care components, self care, and health status. For example, patient self-maintenance correlated with patient shared care decision-making (r = 0.35 p = 0.001), and caregiver shared care decision-making (r = 0.25 p = 0.02). Patient shared care communication correlated with caregiver health status (r = .30, p = .01), and patient health status (r = 0.24 p = 0.02). Caregivers perceived significantly less communication then the patient (t = -2.1, p = .03). Implications for nursing are; nurses can assess shared care components in family dyads, design interventions targeting areas of difficulty, and evaluate the effects of shared care interventions on the patient's decision making ability and self-confidence, and both members health status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:35:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:35:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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